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Tertiary color

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A tertiary color is a color made by mixing one primary color with one secondary color, in a given color space such as RGB[1] or RYB.[2]

Unlike primary and secondary colors, these are not represented by one firmly established name each, but the following examples include some typical names. Brown and grey are sometimes known as Tertiary colors and can be made by mixing complementary colors.

RGB or CMY primariesEdit

File:RBG color wheel.svg

Tertiary color names are seldom used in descriptions of RGB (or equivalently CMYK) systems, but the names below represent colors in the right hue neighborhood.[citation needed]

cyan (●) + blue (●) = azure (●)
blue (●) + magenta (●) = violet (●)
magenta (●) + red (●) = rose (●)
red (●) + yellow (●) = orange (●)
yellow (●) + green (●) = chartreuse (●)
green (●) + cyan (●) = spring green (●)

Traditional painting (RYB)Edit

In the red–yellow–blue system as used in traditional painting, tertiary colors are typically named by combining the names of the adjacent primary and secondary.[3][4]

red (●) + orange (●) = vermilion (●)
orange (●) + yellow (●) = amber[5] (●)
yellow (●) + green (●) = chartreuse (●)
green (●) + blue (●) = aquamarine[5] (●)
blue (●) + violet (●) = indigo (●)
violet (●) + red (●) = violet red (●)

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. Marcus Weise and Diana Weynand (2007). How Video Works, Focal Press.
  2. Stan Place and Bobbi Ray Madry (1990). The Art and Science of Professional Makeup, Thomson Delmar Learning.
  3. Adrienne L. Zihlman (2001). The Human Evolution Coloring Book, HarperCollins.
  4. Kathleen Lochen Staiger (2006). The Oil Painting Course You've Always Wanted: Guided Lessons for Beginners and Experienced Artists, Watson-Guptill.
  5. 5.0 5.1 Susan Crabtree and Peter Beudert (1998). Scenic Art for the Theatre: History, Tools, and Techniques, Focal Press.
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