Wikia

Psychology Wiki

Talk:Inclusive fitness

Back to page

34,192pages on
this wiki


The note at the top of the page asks for the attentiion of an academic expeert on the topic. Michael Orlove, mentioined a few times in the arricle and cited in the references, probably ualifies. After readimg the article, he noted several poblems in it, and asked me to help him contribue. Dr. Orlove is visually impaired and can't post on his own.

For starters, he dictated three paragraphs to me, which I posted.  I see they have been replaced by the original content (which seems to mirror Wikipedia).

Should I contrinue to post his contributions or not?

--Bill Steele, science writer, Cornell University Communications


Wvms (talk) 21:18, July 13, 2015 (UTC)

Why don't you post the suggested changes here for others to consider? Dr. Becker-Weidman Talk 17:15, July 14, 2015 (UTC)

That's not the way I'm used to working with wikis. You don't talk about editing the page; you edit the page.

But anyway, what Mike gave me was:

Inclusive fitness is one of seveal measures of evolutionary success which consists of the sum of the number of one's own offspring plus the number of other "offspring equivalents" an individual leaves behind.  One's own offspring is one offspring equivalent (actually one-half of a self-equivalent). A sibling's offspring would be half of an offspring equivalent, and a cousin's offspring is one-eigth of an offspring equivalent.

Before Hamilton (1963-64) came up with this concept, people measured evolutioinary success as what Hamilton called "personal fitness" which consists of the number of offspring an individual begets (no matter who rears or rescues them). But inclusive fitness counts the offspring equivalents you rear or rescue (no matter who begets them) including your own offspring. Thus, if you help to rear the offspring of a sibling or cousin, you incease your inclusive fitness by adding the offspring equivalent to your own offspring. Inclusive fitness therefore takes into account both the passing of genes from an organism to its offspring and the inheritance of the same genes among relatives and their offspring.

After Hamilton's contributioins either personal fitness or inclusive firness could be used as a measure of evolutionary success.

Selection resulting from this altruistic behavior towards relatives leading to increased fitness has been called "Kin selection" by John Maynard Smith (1964).

REPLACING:

Inclusive fitness encompasses conventional Darwinian fitness with the addition of behaviors that contribute to an organism’s individual fitness through altruism. An organism’s ultimate goal is to leave the maximum number of viable offspring possible, thereby keeping their genes present within a population. Since relatives of an organism are likely to share common genes, an organism may increase its own fitness by keeping its relatives and offspring viable. Kin selection results from this altruistic behavior towards relatives leading to increased fitness in an organism. Inclusive fitness therefore takes into account both the passing of genes from an organism to its offspring and the inheritance of the same genes among relatives and their offspring.


I'm sure he will suggest further changes. He said he found the article "confusing and inaccurate." That's what you get for inviting an expert.

Wvms (talk) 21:27, July 14, 2015 (UTC)


Around Wikia's network

Random Wiki