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Social distance describes the distance between different groups of society and is opposed to locational distance. The notion includes all differences such as social class, race/ethnicity or sexuality, but also the fact that the different groups do not mix. The term is often applied in cities, but its use is not limited to that.

Social periphery is a term often used in conjunction with social distance. It refers to people distant with regard to social relations. It is often implied that it is measured from the dominant city élite. The social periphery of a city is often located in the center.

Locational periphery in contrast is used to describe places physically distant from the heart of the city. These places often include suburbs and are socially close to the core of the city. In some cases the locational periphery overlaps with the social periphery, such as in Paris' banlieus.

In 1991 Mulgan stated that "The centres of two cities are often for practical purposes closer to each other than to their own peripheries."[1] This reference to social distance is especially true for global cities]].


AssessmentEdit

Bogardus Social Distance Scale

Notes Edit

  1. Mulgan G (1991) Communications and Control: Networks and the New Economics of Communication (Polity, Cambridge)

Further readingEdit

  • Bogardus, Emory S., Social Distance in the City. Proceedings and Publications of the American Sociological Society. 20, 1926, 40-46.

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