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(Created page with "{{ClinPsy}} right '''Scissor gait''' is a form of gait abnormality primarily associated with spastic cerebral palsy. That conditio...")
 
 
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==Presentation==
 
==Presentation==
This gait pattern<ref>http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iPje7VDj7_k&NR=1 spastic diplegic gait on YouTube</ref> is reminiscent of a [[marionette]]. [[Hypertonia]] in the legs, hips and pelvis means these areas become flexed, to various degrees, giving the appearance of crouching, while tight adductors produce extreme [[adduction]], presented by knees and thighs hitting, or sometimes even crossing, in a scissors-like movement while the opposing muscles, the abductors, become comparatively weak from lack of use. Most common in patients with spastic cerebral palsy, usually [[spastic diplegia|diplegic]] and [[spastic paraplegia|paraplegic]] varieties, the individual is often also forced to walk on [[tiptoe]] unless the [[plantarflexor]] muscles are released by an orthaepedic surgical procedure.
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This gait pattern<ref>http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iPje7VDj7_k&NR=1 spastic diplegic gait on YouTube</ref> is reminiscent of a marionette. [[Hypertonia]] in the legs, hips and pelvis means these areas become flexed, to various degrees, giving the appearance of crouching, while tight adductors produce extreme [[adduction]], presented by knees and thighs hitting, or sometimes even crossing, in a scissors-like movement while the opposing muscles, the abductors, become comparatively weak from lack of use. Most common in patients with spastic cerebral palsy, usually [[spastic diplegia|diplegic]] and [[spastic paraplegia|paraplegic]] varieties, the individual is often also forced to walk on [[tiptoe]] unless the [[plantarflexor]] muscles are released by an orthaepedic surgical procedure.
   
 
These features are most typical with the scissors gait and usually result in some form and to some degree regardless of the mildness or severity of the spastic CP condition:
 
These features are most typical with the scissors gait and usually result in some form and to some degree regardless of the mildness or severity of the spastic CP condition:

Latest revision as of 17:23, September 12, 2012

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Scissor gait is a form of gait abnormality primarily associated with spastic cerebral palsy. That condition and others like it are associated with an upper motor neuron lesion.[1]

PresentationEdit

This gait pattern[2] is reminiscent of a marionette. Hypertonia in the legs, hips and pelvis means these areas become flexed, to various degrees, giving the appearance of crouching, while tight adductors produce extreme adduction, presented by knees and thighs hitting, or sometimes even crossing, in a scissors-like movement while the opposing muscles, the abductors, become comparatively weak from lack of use. Most common in patients with spastic cerebral palsy, usually diplegic and paraplegic varieties, the individual is often also forced to walk on tiptoe unless the plantarflexor muscles are released by an orthaepedic surgical procedure.

These features are most typical with the scissors gait and usually result in some form and to some degree regardless of the mildness or severity of the spastic CP condition:

  • rigidity and excessive adduction of the leg in swing
  • plantar flexion of the ankle
  • flexion at the knee
  • adduction and internal rotation at the hip
  • progressive contractures of all spastic muscles
  • complicated assisting movements of the upper limbs when walking.[3][4]

Conditions associated with a scissor gaitEdit

External linksEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. Saint, Sanjay; Wiese, Jeff; Bent, Stephen (2006). Clinical clerkships: the answer book, 219, Hagerstown, MD: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.
  2. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iPje7VDj7_k&NR=1 spastic diplegic gait on YouTube
  3. Medline Plus
  4. GP Notebook
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