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Russell G. Foster

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Russell Grant Foster, FRS (born circa 1959) is a British professor of circadian neuroscience, currently based at the University of Oxford. He and his group are credited with the discovery of the non-rod, non-cone, photosensitive ganglion cells in the mammalian retina which provide input to the circadian rhythm system.[1] Foster was elected a fellow of the Royal Society in 2008.[2]

Educated at the University of Bristol with a PhD in Neuroscience from 1984, Foster was a member of the National Science Foundation Center for Biological Rhythms at the University of Virginia before returning to the UK. Internationally, he has received several awards for his discovery of ocular photoreceptors.[1] He is the co-author with writer and broadcaster Leon Kreitzman of two popular science books on circadian rhythms, Rhythms of Life. The Biological Clocks that Control the Daily Lives of Every Living Thing[3][4]and Seasons of Life. The Biological Rhythms That Enable Living Things to Thrive and Survive.[5]

References Edit

  1. 1.0 1.1 (2008). Seven new Royal Society Fellows. The Medical Sciences Division, University of Oxford. URL accessed on 2010-01-24.
  2. (2007). Russell Foster BSc PhD FRS. The University of Oxford. URL accessed on 2009-07-05.
  3. Rhythms of Life. The Biological Clocks that Control the Daily Lives of Every Living Thing. Yale University Press. URL accessed on 2009-07-05.
  4. Harman, Oren (2008-12-24). Time After Time. The New Republic.
  5. Seasons of Life. The Biological Rhythms That Enable Living Things to Thrive and Survive. Yale University Press. URL accessed on 2009-08-13.
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