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Remission is the decrease in or disappearance of signs and symptoms in both mental and physical disorders, with the possibility of a return to normal functioning, in the context of the existence of a chronic condition (e.g., her depression is in remission).  The term carries with it the assumption that the improvement is tenous and an implicit risk of relapse; in which case, the individual may return to a state of full-blown symptomology.  In this sense, their is some understanding of the underlying processes leading to the variation in symptoms.  This contrasts with the notion of spontaneous remission, which implies that these factors are not known.

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