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Persecutory delusions

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Persecutory delusions are a delusional condition in which the affected person believes they are being persecuted. Specifically, they have been defined as containing two central elements:[1]

  1. The individual thinks that harm is occurring, or is going to occur.
  2. The individual thinks that the perceived persecutor has the intention to cause harm.

According to the DSM-IV-TR, persecutory delusions are the most common form of delusions in schizophrenia, where the person believes "he or she is being tormented, followed, tricked, spied on, or ridiculed."[2] In the DSM-IV-TR, persecutory delusions are the main feature of the persecutory type of delusional disorder.

Legal aspects Edit

When the focus is to remedy some injustice by legal action, they are sometimes called "querulous paranoia".[3]

In cases where reporters of stalking behavior have been judged to be making false reports, a majority of them were judged to be delusional.[4][5]

If the delusion results in imprisonment or involuntary commitment, the person may feel justified in this belief.

TreatmentEdit

Persecutory delusions are usually treated with medications for schizophrenia, especially when positive symptoms are present. Both first-generation antipsychotics and second-generation antipsychotics may be useful.[6] Cognitive behavioral therapy has also been used.

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. Freeman, D. & Garety, P.A. (2004) Paranoia: The Psychology of Persecutory Delusions. Hove: PsychoIogy Press. Page 13. ISBN 1-84169-522-X
  2. (2000) Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders: DSM-IV, Washington, DC: American Psychiatric Association.
  3. (2000) Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders: DSM-IV, Washington, DC: American Psychiatric Association.
  4. "After eight uncertain cases were excluded, the false reporting rate was judged to be 11.5%, with the majority of false victims suffering delusions (70%)." DOI:10.1177/0093854803259235
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  5. DOI:10.1891/1559-4343.10.3.163
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  6. Garety, Philippa A.; Freeman, Daniel B.; Bentall, Richard P. (2008). Persecutory delusions: assessment, theory, and treatment, 313, Oxford [Oxfordshire]: Oxford University Press.
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