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Patrick Henry (Pat) DeLeon, PhD, JD, MPH (born January 6, 1943) is an American psychologist, former chief of staff for United States Senator Daniel Inouye and past president of the American Psychological Association (APA). He became an aide for Senator Inouye in 1973, when Inouye served on a committee investigating the Watergate scandal, and remained on the senator's staff for 38 years. After DeLeon's daughter survived meningitis in 1984, he was involved in the establishment of the Emergency Medical Services for Children program. DeLeon helped to create the nursing and pharmacy schools at the University of Hawaii at Hilo.

DeLeon retired in 2011 as Inouye's chief of staff. Upon DeLeon's retirement, Inouye credited him with working to improve education in Hawaii and with furthering public awareness of the importance of psychologists, nurses and other health providers. He has written nearly 175 peer-reviewed papers and has served as a faculty member at several U.S. universities. He received the APA Award for Lifetime Contributions to Psychology in 2009. An APA award in DeLeon's name honors a graduate student who contributes to the advancement of pharmacotherapy in psychology. He was elected to the Institute of Medicine in 2008. He has been named an Honorary Fellow of the American Academy of Nursing.

BiographyEdit

Education and careerEdit

Patrick DeLeon was born on January 6, 1943 in Waterbury, Connecticut.[1][2] He grew up in Waterbury.[3] As a child, DeLeon struggled academically after sustaining unrecognized hearing loss related to a sulfa antibiotic. Due to his lip-reading ability, he did not realize the extent of his hearing loss until he was in college.[4] DeLeon earned an undergraduate liberal arts degree from Amherst College in 1964. He attended graduate school at Purdue University, completing a PhD in psychology in 1969. After finishing his PhD, DeLeon moved to Hawaii and took a job with the University of Hawaii at Hilo's Peace Corps training program. He worked for the state's mental health division before returning to graduate school. He earned a Master of Public Health (MPH) from the University of Hawaii at Manoa in 1973.[5]

DeLeon completed a public health internship in Washington, D.C. with Senator Daniel Inouye in 1973. At the time, the senator was on the United States Senate Watergate Committee; DeLeon's internship started on the first day of the Watergate hearings. DeLeon remained on Inouye's staff after the internship. In 1980, DeLeon graduated from Catholic University of America's Columbus School of Law and he remained a staff assistant with Inouye after law school. Inouye and DeLeon supported the creation of the Emergency Medical Services for Children program after DeLeon's daughter became critically ill with meningitis in 1984. Though his daughter survived, DeLeon learned that the average hospital emergency room was not equipped to deal with seriously ill infants or their families.[4][6]

DeLeon has held numerous roles within the American Psychological Association (APA). In 1987, he was president of the Society of Clinical Psychology, APA's Division 12.[7] DeLeon was editor of Professional Psychology: Research and Practice from 1995 to 2000.[8] He served as APA president in 2000.[9] He is the editor of Psychological Services, a consulting editor for Professional Psychology: Research and Practice and a contributing editor for Psychotherapy Bulletin.[10][11] He is a Fellow of the American Society for the Advancement of Pharmacotherapy, APA's Division 55.[12][13]

DeLeon has been an advocate for the prescriptive authority for psychologists movement. While he served on the APA Board of Directors, DeLeon and Inouye were largely responsible for a 1988 legislative measure that authorized psychopharmacology training for United States Department of Defense psychologists.[14] Around the same time, he worked to secure prescriptive privileges for nurse practitioners.[6] According to Inouye, DeLeon also played major roles in the development of the schools of pharmacy and nursing at the University of Hawaii at Hilo.[15] In 2011, DeLeon retired as Inouye's chief of staff after more than 38 years of service with the senator.[5]

As of 2012, DeLeon held a distinguished professorship in health policy and research at the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences. He has been an adjunct faculty member at Vanderbilt University, Widener University and the University of Hawaii campuses in Hilo and Manoa.[5]

Honors and awardsEdit

In 2008, DeLeon was designated a member of the Institute of Medicine.[16] He was recognized the next year with the APA Award for Lifetime Contributions to Psychology, the organization's highest award.[17] He won the inaugural Advocacy Award from the National Council of Schools and Programs of Professional Psychology in 2004.[18] DeLeon is also an Honorary Fellow of the American Academy of Nursing.[19]

He is the recipient of honorary doctorates from Nova Southeastern University, the Forest Institute and the California School of Professional Psychology.[20] The Patrick H. DeLeon Prize was established by Division 55 of the APA to honor a graduate student who makes significant contributions to advance pharmacotherapy in psychology.[21]


Preceded by:
Richard M. Suinn
Patrick H. Deleon elected APA President
2000
Succeeded by:
Norine G. Johnson

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. Plante, Thomas (2011). Contemporary Clinical Psychology, John Wiley & Sons.
  2. Top Sen. Inouye Aide Elected to Prestigious Honor. US Fed News Service, Including US State News Template:Subscription required. URL accessed on July 6, 2013.
  3. Two Great Minds. APA Monitor on Psychology 40 (6).
  4. 4.0 4.1 Clay, Rebecca. A Trailblazer Moves On. APA Monitor on Psychology 43 (1).
  5. 5.0 5.1 5.2 Patrick H. DeLeon, PhD, JD: 2012 Distinguished Alumni Award. University of Hawaii Alumni Association. URL accessed on July 6, 2013.
  6. 6.0 6.1 Rabasca, Lisa. No Goal Out of Reach. APA Monitor on Psychology 31 (1).
  7. Division 12 Presidents. American Psychological Association. URL accessed on July 6, 2013.
  8. Weiner, Irving (2012). Handbook of Psychology: Volume 1 (History of Psychology), John Wiley & Sons.
  9. Former APA Presidents. American Psychological Association. URL accessed on July 6, 2013.
  10. Psychological Services. American Psychological Association. URL accessed on July 6, 2013.
  11. Professional Psychology: Research and Practice. American Psychological Association. URL accessed on July 6, 2013.
  12. Division 55 Fellows. APA Division 55. URL accessed on July 6, 2013.
  13. (2013). {{{title}}}. Psychotherapy Bulletin 48 (2).
  14. includeonly>"Doctors Protest Letting Military Psychologists Prescribe Drugs", April 25, 1989. Retrieved on July 6, 2013.
  15. Longtime Chief of Staff to Hawaii Senator Retiring. KPUA. URL accessed on July 6, 2013.
  16. Directory: IOM Member - Patrick H. DeLeon, Ph.D., M.P.H., J.D.. Institute of Medicine. URL accessed on July 6, 2013.
  17. Award for Lifetime Contributions to Psychology. American Psychological Association. URL accessed on July 6, 2013.
  18. NCSPP Awards. National Council of Schools and Programs of Professional Psychology. URL accessed on July 6, 2013.
  19. Honorary Fellows. American Academy of Nursing. URL accessed on July 6, 2013.
  20. Pat DeLeon, Ph.D.. Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences. URL accessed on July 6, 2013.
  21. Patrick H. DeLeon Prize for Outstanding Student Contribution to the Advancement of Pharmacotherapy. American Psychological Association. URL accessed on July 6, 2013.

PublicationsEdit

BooksEdit

Book ChaptersEdit

PapersEdit

External linksEdit

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