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Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention

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The Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (or OJJDP) is an office of the United States Department of Justice and a component of the Office of Justice Programs.

OJJDP sponsors research, program, and training initiatives; develops priorities and goals and sets policies to guide federal juvenile justice issues. OJJDP also disseminates information about juvenile justice issues and awards funds to states to support local programming nationwide through the office's five organizational components.

The office cooperates with other federal agencies on special projects. For example, it formed the National Gang Center along with the Office of Justice Programs (OJP) and the Bureau of Justice Assistance (BJA). The OJJDP has the the National Youth Gang Center™ linked through the National Gang Center.[1]

The office is headed by an administrator. Since April 2002, J. Robert Flores has held that position.


ControversyEdit

As of May 2008, Flores and the OJJDP were under congressional investigation for how $8.6 million was awarded to programs combating juvenile delinquency. The controversy involves money granted to programs with ties to George W. Bush. 10 grants were awarded. The organization, Best Friends Foundation, run by founder and president, Elayne Bennett, wife of William Bennett, ranked 51st out of 104 applications, was awarded $1.1 million over a three year period. The organization promotes self-respect, abstinence and rejection of illegal drug and alcohol use.

Similarly, The World Golf Association, with George H. W. Bush speaking at one of that group's functions, was awarded grant money because it was the highest ranked applicant with sports as their primary function. Of the 104 applicants, only one other applicant had a sports bid. A one-year grant of $500,000 was awarded for the organization's "First Tee" program. The World Golf Association was ranked 47th among all the bids.

Henry Waxman (D-CA) sitting on the United States House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform leads the congressional investigation into wrongdoing.

Brian Ross of ABC News reported on the investigation on World News Now, June 10, 2008.[1]

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. includeonly>Ross, Brian, Anna Schecter and Murray Waas. "Justice Department Official Awards $500,000 Grant to Golf Group", Nightline, ABC News, 2008-06-09. Retrieved on 2008-06-12.

External linksEdit

Template:Law-enforcement-stub

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