Wikia

Psychology Wiki

Changes: Nosology

Edit

Back to page

 
Line 1: Line 1:
 
{{ClinPsy}}
 
{{ClinPsy}}
   
'''Nosology''' (in [[Greek language|Greek]] ''Nosos'' = Disease) is a branch of [[medicine]] that deals with classification of [[disease]]s.
+
'''Nosology''' (from the Greek "''nosos''," "disease") is a branch of [[medicine]] that deals with [[classification]] of [[disease]]s.
   
Diseases can be classified by [[etiology]] (cause), [[pathogenesis]] (mechanism in which the agent causes disease) or by [[symptom]]. Alternatively, diseases can be classified according to the [[organ system]] they involve, but this is often complicated as many diseases affect multiple organs.
+
Diseases may be classified by [[etiology]] (cause), [[pathogenesis]] ([[mechanism]] by which the disease is caused), or by [[symptom]](s). Alternatively, diseases may be classified according to the [[organ system]] involved, though this is often complicated since many diseases affect more than one organ.
   
One of the main problems with nosologies is that diseases often cannot be defined and classified clearly especially when pathogenesis or causality is not known. So, diagnostic terms often are in fact only symptoms or sets of symptoms ([[syndrome|syndromes]]).
+
A chief difficulty in nosology is that diseases often cannot be defined and classified clearly, especially when etiology or pathogenesis are unknown. Thus diagnostic terms often only reflect a symptom or set of symptoms ([[syndrome]]).
  +
  +
One of the earliest efforts at developing a classification of diseases began in the [[10th century]], when the [[Islamic psychology|Arabian psychologist]] Najab ud-din Unhammad classified a nosology of nine major categories of [[mental disorder]]s, which included 30 different mental illnesses in total. Some of the categories he described included [[obsessive-compulsive disorder]]s, [[delusional disorder]]s, [[degenerative disease]]s, [[involutional melancholia]], and states of abnormal excitement.<ref>{{citation|title=Masters of the Mind: Exploring the Story of Mental Illness from Ancient Times to the New Millennium|first=Theodore|last=Millon|year=2004|publisher=[[John Wiley & Sons]]|isbn=0471679615|page=38}}</ref>
  +
  +
In the 18th century, the taxonomist Carolus Linnaeus, Francois Boissier de Sauvages, and psychiatrist [[Phillipe Pinel]] developed an early classification of physical illnesses. [[Thomas Sydenham]]'s work in the late 17th century might also be considered a nosology. In the 19th century, [[Emil Kraepelin]] and then [[Jacques Bertillon]] developed their own nosologies. Bertillon's work, classifying causes of [[death]], was a precursor of the modern medical-billing code system, [[ICD]].
  +
  +
The early nosological efforts grouped [[disease]]s by their [[symptom]]s, whereas modern systems (e.g. [[SNOMED]]) focus on grouping diseases by the [[anatomy]] and [[etiology]] involved.
   
 
==See also==
 
==See also==
Line 15: Line 15:
 
* Gordon L. Snider, Nosology for Our Day Its Application to Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, ''American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine'' Vol 167. pp. 678-683, (2003). [http://ajrccm.atsjournals.org/cgi/content/full/167/5/678 fulltext]
 
* Gordon L. Snider, Nosology for Our Day Its Application to Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, ''American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine'' Vol 167. pp. 678-683, (2003). [http://ajrccm.atsjournals.org/cgi/content/full/167/5/678 fulltext]
   
{{med-stub}}
 
   
  +
[[Category:Clasification]]
 
[[Category:Nosology|*]]
 
[[Category:Nosology|*]]
   
  +
<!--
  +
[[ca:Nosologia]]
 
[[de:Nosologie]]
 
[[de:Nosologie]]
  +
[[es:Nosología]]
 
[[fr:Nosologie]]
 
[[fr:Nosologie]]
  +
[[id:Nosologi]]
  +
[[ia:Nosologia]]
  +
[[it:Nosologia]]
 
[[hu:Nosológia]]
 
[[hu:Nosológia]]
 
[[pl:Nozologia]]
 
[[pl:Nozologia]]
{{enWp|Nosology}}
+
[[pt:Nosologia]]
  +
[[tr:Nozoloji]]
  +
-->
  +
{{enWP|Nosology}}

Latest revision as of 00:12, April 9, 2008

Assessment | Biopsychology | Comparative | Cognitive | Developmental | Language | Individual differences | Personality | Philosophy | Social |
Methods | Statistics | Clinical | Educational | Industrial | Professional items | World psychology |

Clinical: Approaches · Group therapy · Techniques · Types of problem · Areas of specialism · Taxonomies · Therapeutic issues · Modes of delivery · Model translation project · Personal experiences ·


Nosology (from the Greek "nosos," "disease") is a branch of medicine that deals with classification of diseases.

Diseases may be classified by etiology (cause), pathogenesis (mechanism by which the disease is caused), or by symptom(s). Alternatively, diseases may be classified according to the organ system involved, though this is often complicated since many diseases affect more than one organ.

A chief difficulty in nosology is that diseases often cannot be defined and classified clearly, especially when etiology or pathogenesis are unknown. Thus diagnostic terms often only reflect a symptom or set of symptoms (syndrome).

One of the earliest efforts at developing a classification of diseases began in the 10th century, when the Arabian psychologist Najab ud-din Unhammad classified a nosology of nine major categories of mental disorders, which included 30 different mental illnesses in total. Some of the categories he described included obsessive-compulsive disorders, delusional disorders, degenerative diseases, involutional melancholia, and states of abnormal excitement.[1]

In the 18th century, the taxonomist Carolus Linnaeus, Francois Boissier de Sauvages, and psychiatrist Phillipe Pinel developed an early classification of physical illnesses. Thomas Sydenham's work in the late 17th century might also be considered a nosology. In the 19th century, Emil Kraepelin and then Jacques Bertillon developed their own nosologies. Bertillon's work, classifying causes of death, was a precursor of the modern medical-billing code system, ICD.

The early nosological efforts grouped diseases by their symptoms, whereas modern systems (e.g. SNOMED) focus on grouping diseases by the anatomy and etiology involved.

See alsoEdit

External linksEdit

  • Gordon L. Snider, Nosology for Our Day Its Application to Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine Vol 167. pp. 678-683, (2003). fulltext
This page uses Creative Commons Licensed content from Wikipedia (view authors).

Cite error: <ref> tags exist, but no <references/> tag was found

Around Wikia's network

Random Wiki