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This is a list of 96 competencies issued by the NHS as as part of their competency framework for mental health workers. All staff are required to demonstrate that that their practice reflects up to date information and policies in each area to maintain qualification ffor a competence.


1. Promote effective communication and relationships with people who are troubled or distressed This competence covers promoting communication and relationships with individuals whose communication and relationships are affected, directly or indirectly, by mental health problems. The distress or impairment may be a transient, fluctuating or permanent feature of the individual's social functioning. The distress may be directly associated with mental illness or caused by other factors, such as physical illness or bereavement, which may create mental health problems.

2. Enable people with mental health needs to access and benefit from services This competence is about enabling individuals with mental health needs to access and use services. The services may be within mental health or may be other mainstream services such as education, housing, other health or social care services e.g. ante natal services.

3. Work with service providers to support people with mental health needs in ways which promote their rights This competence covers working with service providers to enable them to support individuals with mental health needs to access and use their services.The services may be within mental health or may be other mainstream services such as education, housing, other health or social care services e.g. ante natal services.

4. Assist individuals to evaluate and contact support networks This competence covers working with individuals to help them evaluate the applicability of mutual support networks to them. The networks may range from being loose and relatively unstructured to being more formal organisations which have clear objectives and structures. The support networks may be for individuals with mental health needs, carers or family and friends. As mutual support networks are one of the many, diverse forms of service provision which are available and are often capable of meeting individuals' needs in different ways, a key aspect of this workforce competence is the promotion of diversity and encouraging support networks to be as effective, inclusive and self-managing as possible. You also need to consider throughout the process any conflicts which there may be between your role as a resource to a particular network and your broader role in meeting the individual's needs on an on-going basis.This workforce competence is for those who, as part of their job role, contribute to the establishment and running of support networks whether they are employed in the statutory, private or voluntary sector.

5. Enable support networks to develop their effectiveness This competence covers working with support networks to enable them to develop their effectiveness in meeting the needs of individuals with mental health needs, carers or family and friends. The networks may range from being loose and relatively unstructured to being more formal organisations which have clear objectives and structures. As mutual support networks are one of the many, diverse forms of service provision which are available and are often capable of meeting individuals' needs in different ways, a key aspect of this workforce competence is the promotion of diversity and encouraging support networks to be as effective, inclusive and self-managing as possible. You also need to consider throughout the process any conflicts which there may be between your role as a resource to a particular network and your broader role in meeting the individual's needs on an on-going basis.This workforce competence applies to those who, as part of their job role, contribute to the establishment and running of support networks whether they are employed in the statutory, private or voluntary sector.

6. Assess the needs of carers and families of individuals with mental health needs This competence is about establishing the strengths, vulnerabilities, needs and circumstances of carers and families and using this information to assess their support needs.The term ‘carers and families' is used to mean any persons who have an active and on-going informal role in caring for the individual with mental health needs, including those with a familial relationship to the individual. Partners, where they exist, would be considered as family members. The individual with mental health needs may be an adult of working age, a child or adolescent or an older person.This workforce competence applies to those who are responsible and accountable, within statutory or voluntary organisations, for identifying the support needs of carers and families of individuals with mental health needs. It would be particularly suitable for care co-ordinators.

7 Develop, implement and review programmes of support for carers and families This competence covers developing, implementing and reviewing programmes of support for carers and families of individuals.The term ‘carers and families' is used to mean any persons who have an active and on-going informal role in caring for the individual, including those with a familial relationship to the individual. Partners, where they exist, would be considered as family members. The individual may be an adult of working age, a child or adolescent or an older person.This workforce competence applies to those who are responsible and accountable, within statutory or voluntary organisations, for developing, implementing and reviewing programmes of support for carers and families of individuals with mental health needs. It would be particularly suitable for care co-ordinators.

8. Establish, sustain and disengage from relationships with the families of children and young people This workforce competence covers establishing, sustaining and disengaging from working relationships with the families of children and young people as part of an overall programme of work. The workforce competence covers initial contact with families where ground rules are explained and expectations are clearly set out. The workforce competence also covers sustaining and developing the relationship and deals with how the worker eventually disengages from their relationship with families. The relationship may be established and sustained as part of a care programme for a child or young person with mental health needs or may occur when a parent has mental health needs that impact on their relationships with their children.This workforce competence applies to those workers who have specific responsibility for working with the families of children and young people.

9. Empower families, carers and others to support individuals with mental health needs This competence is about working with families, carers and others to encourage and enable them to support individuals with mental health needs through the provision of practical and emotional support and helping them to review and develop the support they provide and receive.The term ‘carers and families' is used to mean any persons who have an active and on-going informal role in caring for the individual with mental health needs, including those with a familial relationship to the individual. Partners, where they exist, would be considered as family members. The individuals with mental health needs may be adults of working age, children or adolescents or older people.Others who may be involved in supporting individuals with mental health needs includes friends and others within the individual's social network such as religious leaders.This workforce competence applies to those who work with families, carers and others to enable them to support individuals with mental health needs.

10. Establish, sustain and disengage from relationships with the families of older people with mental health needs This competence is about establishing, sustaining and disengaging from working relationships with the families of older people with mental health needs as part of an overall programme of work. The workforce competence covers initial contact with families where requirements and expectations are discussed and agreed. The workforce competence also covers sustaining and developing the relationship and deals with how the worker eventually disengages from their relationship with families. This workforce competence applies to those workers who have specific responsibility for working with the families of older people with mental health needs.

11. Enable families to address issues with individuals’ behaviour This competence is about enabling families to address issues with individual's behaviour (such as aggression, behaviour that exposes the individual or others to risk, substance abuse, bullying). The main reason for undertaking this work is as a preventive measure to address behaviour before it becomes problematic and tending towards self-harm, harm to others or triggering crisis situations within the family. It involves working with families to enable them to understand the reasons for the individual behaving in a certain way and the context of the behaviour. You enable families to support the individual to address their current ways of behaving and develop positive alternatives. You will have an important role in enabling families, and through them the individual, to develop an insight into their behaviour. This workforce competence applies to those who work with families to address issues with individuals' behaviour. The individual may be a family member with mental health needs but sometimes this work may occur when a parent or sibling of a child or young person has mental health needs and a worker recognises that preventive work needs to be undertaken in relation to the individual to minimise the risk of triggering crisis situations within the family. While the workforce competence has a clear relevance to work with the families of children and young people, it is not restricted to this age range and also applies to work with the families of adults and older people who are living within the family environment.

12. Support families in maintaining relationships in their wider social structures and environments This competence covers promoting social inclusion through encouraging and supporting families to use services and maintain social contacts within the community.The approach promoted through this workforce competence is collaborative, non-directive and enabling and recognises the rights of families to make their own decisions and choices and to be supported in following these through. The workforce competence recognises the importance of social interactions and relationships within the context of people's lives.This workforce competence applies to those who work with individuals and families to enable them to develop and maintain relationships within their communities.

13. Work with families, carers and individuals during times of crisis This competence covers working with individuals and their carers and families in times of crisis to assess the urgency of requests for action, take and review the effectiveness of actions to meet needs and agree risk management strategies.The term ‘carers and families' is used to mean any persons who have an active and on-going informal role in caring for the individual with mental health needs, including those with a familial relationship to the individual. Partners, where they exist, would be considered as family members. Individuals with mental health needs may be adults of working age, children or adolescents or older people.This workforce competence applies to those who respond to and work with individuals with mental health needs and their carers and families during times of crisis.

14. Identify potential mental health needs and related issues This competence covers the initial identification of mental health needs. Partners, families and/or friends of the individual should be included in the discussion of the individual's needs only where s/he has agreed for this to happen, except when working with children and young people, when discussion and agreement about referral to mental health and/or other services must include the parent or legal guardian. This workforce competence applies to people who identify and act on indications of mental health needs as part of their wider job role. This includes those working in areas such as primary health care, accident and emergency departments, social services, criminal justice and other areas where people with mental health needs are likely to present themselves.

15. Refer individuals to mental health and/or other services This competence covers referral of the individual with identified mental health needs to mental health services and/or other services appropriate to their immediate needs.Partners, families and/or friends of the individual should be included in the discussion of the individual's needs only where s/he has agreed for this to happen, except when working with children and young people, when discussion and agreement about referral to mental health and/or other services must include the parent or legal guardian. This workforce competence applies to people who identify and act on indications of mental health needs as part of their wider job role. This includes those working in areas such as primary health care, accident and emergency departments, social services, criminal justice and other areas where people with mental health needs are likely to present themselves.

16. Assess individuals’ needs and circumstances and evaluate the risk of abuse, failure to protect and harm to self and others This competence covers identifying the needs and circumstances of the individual in relation to the possibility of harm being suffered or caused.This workforce competence is one in which multi-disciplinary and inter-agency working may be a feature, particularly with regard to the exchange of information to support identification of needs and assessments and in communicating the results of assessments.This workforce competence applies to qualified staff who work with individuals to assess how they function in everyday life and any related risks to the individual or others which would call for interventions.

17. Assess the need for intervention and present assessments of individuals’ needs and related risks This competence covers assessing the need for intervention to manage risk to the individual or others and presenting assessment of individuals' needs and related risks. Interventions can take a variety of forms with therapeutic outcomes leading to recovery.This workforce competence is one in which multi-disciplinary and inter-agency working may be a feature, particularly with regard to the exchange of information to support identification of needs and assessments and in communicating the results of assessments.This workforce competence applies to qualified staff who work with individuals to assess how they function in everyday life and any related risks to the individual or others which would call for interventions.

18. Identify the physical health needs of individuals with mental health needs This competence covers identifying an individual's physical health needs and their capability, or that of their carer, to address these needs within the limitations and risks of the individual's mental health needs.This workforce competence applies to anyone responsible for identifying the physical health needs of individuals with mental health needs and determining appropriate courses of action to promote their physical health.

19. Co-ordinate, monitor and review service responses to meet individuals’ needs and circumstances This competence covers implementing agreed responses to the needs and circumstances of individuals and involves co-ordinating, monitoring, adjusting and reviewing the provision of services to the individualAs a central focus of this workforce competence is the co-operation, monitoring and review of service responses to meet individuals' needs, you need to be very aware of your relative position of power to the individual and the rights of the individual in the process. You will need to understand the concepts of empowerment and participation and how these inform or influence the involvement of individuals and carers in the co-ordination of care, and how the concepts of efficiency, effectiveness, economy and equity inform and influence the co-ordination of services.This workforce competence applies to practitioners in all types of service settings who are responsible for monitoring the effectiveness of service provision in relation to either their role as a service provider or in relation to agreed joint working with other workers and organisations. This will involve monitoring the effectiveness of individual care plans and service objectives. Methods of monitoring and evaluation are both formal and informal.

20. Work with individuals with mental health needs to negotiate and agree plans for addressing those needs This competence covers reviewing the mental health needs of individuals and the options available for addressing these needs. You need to recommend a care programme approach that balances the needs and preferences of the individual and others, taking account of any legal requirements and of your duties and responsibilities as a mental health practitioner. Working with the individual and those who support them to develop care programmes which support recovery is a fundamental aspect of needs-led service provision. In taking this forward you need to understand the concepts of empowerment and participation.This workforce competence applies to those who work with individuals with identified mental health needs to consider, negotiate and agree plans for addressing these needs.

21. Respond to crisis situations This competence covers responding to crisis situations by assessing the urgency for action, identifying the need for legal or procedural intervention, taking action to meet the immediate needs and reviewing the outcomes with others involved.This workforce competence applies to practitioners who respond to crisis situations such as mental illness, family violence, family breakdown, attempted suicide, death. In the context of mental health, the crisis situations will involve individuals with mental health needs, e.g. risk of self-harm or harm to others, potential or actual abuse, death of a parent/carer.

22. Maintain active continuing contact with individuals and work with them to monitor their mental health needs This competence covers working with individuals on care programmes to monitor their mental health and related needs over time and to identify and agree changes to care programmes to reflect progress made and any changes in the individual's needs and circumstances. The on-going monitoring of the appropriateness and effectiveness of care programmes is a fundamental aspect of needs-led service provision.This workforce competence applies to those who are responsible for maintaining contact and working with individuals on care programmes to monitor their progress and on-going needs.

23. Plan and review the effectiveness of therapeutic interventions with individuals with mental health needs This competence covers planning and reviewing therapeutic interventions with individuals with mental health needs as part of their overall care programme.The workforce competence is based on the premise that for effective care planning and review to take place, you need to have sufficient understanding of the context of the individual and the holistic nature of health and social well being. You must be able to communicate effectively with individuals and significant others and integrate your work with that of other practitioners. Throughout the process, individuals and significant others are encouraged and supported to take an active part and this is enhanced by using, as far as is possible, therapeutic interventions which are sustainable by the individual in their own context.When working with children and young people, you will need to take account of their age and stage of development as well as the context of the family or substitute care and ensure that planning and review of therapeutic interventions are carried out in active collaboration with their parents/guardians. It will also be important to hear the child or young person's own views in planning, delivery and evaluation, not only those of the parents/guardians.This workforce competence applies to those who work with people with mental health needs to provide therapeutic interventions within an overall care programme. It is applicable to qualified therapists responsible for providing any type of therapy that might be provided for individuals with mental health needs in any sort of care settings.

24. Implement, monitor and evaluate therapeutic interventions within an overall care programme This competence covers implementing and reviewing therapeutic interventions and ending your involvement with individuals following therapeutic interventions with individuals with mental health needs as part of their overall care programme.The workforce competence is based on the premise that for effective care implementation to take place, you need to have sufficient understanding of the context of the individual and the holistic nature of health and social well being. You must be able to communicate effectively with individuals and significant others and integrate your work with that of other practitioners. Throughout the process, individuals and significant others are encouraged and supported to take an active part and this is enhanced by using, as far as is possible, therapeutic interventions which are sustainable by the individual in their own context.When working with children and young people, you will need to take account of their age and stage of development as well as the context of the family or substitute care and ensure that implementation and evaluation of therapeutic interventions are carried out in active collaboration with their parents/guardians. It will also be important to hear the child or young person's own views in planning, delivery and evaluation, not only those of the parents/guardians.

25. Contribute to the assessment of needs and the planning, evaluation and review of individualised programmes of care for individuals This competence covers working as a member of an inter-disciplinary team through contributing to the assessment of service users' needs, contributing to the planning of individualised programmes of care, and contributing to evaluation and review. The assessment methods and approaches and the nature of interventions will be those which are agreed on a case-by-case basis with other members of the inter-disciplinary team. The term ‘inter-disciplinary team' has been used to mean teams formed of practitioners drawn from different professions (or different disciplines within a profession) who are working together as a co-ordinated team to achieve agreed objectives with service users.As you will be one of the main points of contact with individuals and will be undertaking specific individualised programmes of care, probably on a person-focused basis, there is a strong focus in this workforce competence on promoting individual's rights. Due to the nature of the interventions, there will also be a number of issues related to confidentiality and consideration of who has access to certain information.When working with children and young people, you will need to take account of their age and stage of development as well as the context of the family or substitute care and ensure that planning, implementation and evaluation of therapeutic activities is carried out in active collaboration with their parents/guardians.This workforce competence applies to people who work as a member of an inter-disciplinary team to plan, and review individualised programmes of care for people with mental health needs.The focus of the work is likely to be related to the services offered by an integrated service (such as a rehabilitation workforce competence, community mental health team or in day care) or the service offered by a functional team (such as assertive outreach, crisis intervention). It is particularly relevant to mental health practitioners working within schools. It is likely that the practitioner will specialise in working with one particular service user group or in one setting.

26. Implement specific parts of individualised programmes of care This competence covers working as a member of an inter-disciplinary team through implementing specific parts of individualised programmes and contributing to evaluation and review. The term ‘inter-disciplinary team' has been used to mean teams formed of practitioners drawn from different professions (or different disciplines within a profession) who are working together as a co-ordinated team to achieve agreed objectives with service users.As you will be one of the main points of contact with individuals and will be undertaking specific individualised programmes of care, probably on a person-focused basis, there is a strong focus in this workforce competence on promoting individual's rights. Due to the nature of the interventions, there will also be a number of issues related to confidentiality and consideration of who has access to certain information.When working with children and young people, you will need to take account of their age and stage of development as well as the context of the family or substitute care and ensure that planning, implementation and evaluation of therapeutic activities is carried out in active collaboration with their parents/guardians.This workforce competence applies to people who work as a member of an inter-disciplinary team to implement specific parts of individualised programmes of care for people with mental health needs.The focus of the work is likely to be related to the services offered by an integrated service (such as a rehabilitation workforce competence, community mental health team or in day care) or the service offered by a functional team (such as assertive outreach, crisis intervention). It is particularly relevant to mental health practitioners working within schools. It is likely that the practitioner will specialise in working with one particular service user group or in one setting.

27 Reinforce positive behavioural goals during relationships with individuals This competence covers the complex task of establishing and sustaining effective working relationships with individuals as part of an overall strategy to confront anti-social behaviour and promote pro-social behaviour. A key part of this is making individuals recognise and take responsibility for their own behaviour and their obligations to others.The workforce competence covers initial contact with the individual where ground rules are explained and the expectations of the individual are clearly set out. The workforce competence also covers sustaining and developing the relationship and deals with how you eventually disengage from your relationship with individuals. This workforce competence is based on modelling pro-social behaviour. The initial contact might be through individual self-referral, as part of the case management process, or as a result of the individual being referred by other individuals or agencies.The term ‘individuals' refers to the people with mental health needs with whom you work.This workforce competence applies to mental health practitioners who are involved in work that is intended to lead - directly or indirectly - to reducing anti-social behaviour of individuals with mental health needs.

28. Promote the benefits of activities to improve physical health and well-being This competence covers promoting the physical and mental health of individuals in a holistic way - recognising the inter-relatedness of these and the difficulties that individuals may have in understanding their physical health needs and how these may be addressed.Activities to improve physical health refers to clinical procedures and treatments (such as the care of skin lesions, the application of dressings, elimination and other treatments specific to the individual), the taking of physical measurements (e.g. temperature, pulse and respiration) and obtaining specimens, or therapeutic interventions such as special diets, exercise, massage or relaxation. This workforce competence applies to mental health practitioners involved in promoting the physical health of individuals with mental health needs. The practitioner may be directly responsible for aspects of the individual's physical health care or may be working alongside another health care practitioner who is responsible for implementing activities to monitor, maintain or improve the individual's physical health.

29. Support individuals during activities to improve their physical health and wellbeing This workforce competence covers supporting individuals during activities to improve physical health. These may involve clinical procedures and treatments (such as the care of skin lesions, the application of dressings, elimination and other treatments specific to the individual), the taking of physical measurements (e.g. temperature, pulse and respiration) and obtaining specimens, or therapeutic interventions such as special diets, exercise, massage or relaxation. This workforce competence applies to mental health practitioners involved in promoting the physical health of individuals with mental health needs. The practitioner may be directly responsible for aspects of the individual's physical health care or may be working alongside another health care practitioner who is responsible for implementing activities to monitor, maintain or improve the individual's physical health.

30. Enable individuals to obtain and maintain household and personal goods This workforce competence covers helping individuals to be as self-managing and autonomous as possible in relation to obtaining and maintaining household and personal goods.This workforce competence applies to practitioners who support individuals in maintaining their domestic and personal resources. It will be particularly relevant to support workers or care assistants who support individuals living in their own homes or in group living environments such as residential care or community housing.

31 Enable individuals to maintain the safety and security of their living environment This competence covers helping individuals to be as self-managing and autonomous as possible in relation to maintaining the safety and security of their living environment.This workforce competence applies to practitioners who support individuals in maintaining their domestic and personal resources. It will be particularly relevant to support workers or care assistants who support individuals living in their own homes or in group living environments such as residential care or community housing.

32. Enable individuals to maintain their personal hygiene and appearance This competence covers enabling individuals to maintain their personal hygiene and appearance where they are in need of such assistance for whatever reason. It covers supporting individuals in undertaking all forms of personal hygiene care and personal presentation, including those individuals who make use of specialised equipment to assist them in these tasks.The support which the individual wishes and needs is confirmed with them and the support given is appropriate to the individual's needs, with the aim of encouraging individuals to be as self-managing as possible and motivating them to present themselves appropriately. The individual's preferences and wishes must be taken into account, including those arising from cultural or religious norms, and their privacy and dignity respected. Conflicts that may arise between individual choice, good hygiene practices, the individual's care plan and your own feelings need to be acknowledged and dealt with appropriately.This workforce competence does not address the provision of on-going support for individuals who require assistance with physical care aspects of daily living including assistance with eating, drinking, defecation and urination. This workforce competence applies to those who work with individuals who are able to contribute to maintaining their own personal hygiene and appearance but need some specific support, whether it be physical assistance or advice and guidance. It will be relevant to those who provide personal care to individuals in all care settings - hospital, residential, day-care or in the individual's own home.

33. Enable individuals with mental health needs to access housing and accommodation This competence covers enabling individuals with mental health needs to access appropriate housing and accommodation. The workforce competence relates primarily to the support given to those who are not currently in accommodation which is appropriate to their needs, whether this be their own homes or other settings. The workforce competence does not cover visiting and assisting individuals in their own homes with the maintenance of their property and living accommodation.Housing and accommodation covers affordable housing, housing association properties, accommodation for rent in the private and public sectors, supported housing, community housing and residential care places.This workforce competence applies to those who work directly with individuals with mental health needs to assist them to find and maintain appropriate housing and accommodation and any related services.

34. Enable housing and accommodation services to support individuals with mental health needs This competence covers enabling housing and accommodation services to support individuals with mental health needs. Housing and accommodation covers affordable housing, housing association properties, accommodation for rent in the private and public sectors, supported housing, community housing and residential care places.This workforce competence applies to those who need to work directly with housing and accommodation services to enable them to support individuals with mental health needs.

35. Support individuals in undertaking procedures and treatments This competence covers encouraging and supporting individuals in undertaking health care in accordance with the individual's care programme.The health care activities covered include procedures and treatments (such as the care of skin lesions, the application of dressings, elimination and other treatments specific to the individual) and administering the client's own medication. This workforce competence applies to those who prepare and support individuals in undertaking health care. This workforce competence is likely to be most applicable to rehabilitation and community settings.

36. Support individuals to administer their own medication This competence covers encouraging and supporting individuals in administering their own medication in accordance with the individual's care programme. This workforce competence applies to those who prepare and support individuals to administer their own medication. This workforce competence is likely to be most applicable to rehabilitation and community settings.

37. Recognise, respect and support the spiritual well-being of individuals This competence covers recognising, respecting and supporting people's spiritual well-being. This involves identifying opportunities to support individuals' spiritual well-being, providing opportunities that facilitate and support spiritual well-being, and evaluating and reporting on work that relates to spiritual well-being. This workforce competence applies to those who are in a position to encourage and enable individuals to identify and address their personal spiritual needs.

38. Enable people to choose and participate in activities that are meaningful to them This workforce competence covers encouraging individuals with mental health needs to choose and take part in activities that are meaningful to them. These include educational, recreational and work activities. The activities may be provided specifically for individuals in care settings such as day centres, residential homes, inpatient settings, or those provided within the community for the general public such as job clubs, evening classes, voluntary work, leisure interest groups (e.g. drama group, gardening club). A key consideration in this workforce competence is the importance of taking steps to ensure equality of opportunity to participate.This workforce competence applies to mental health practitioners whose role includes encouraging and supporting individuals with mental health needs to take part in activities which will promote their mental health and have some meaning for them.

39. Enable individuals and families to identify factors affecting, and options for optimising, their mental health and social well-being This workforce competence is about enabling individuals and families to address issues which affect their mental health. The term ‘address' has been used to mean ‘paying attention to the issues and trying to understand them and deal with them'. The primary focus for this workforce competence is enabling individuals and families to make choices about their lives. Confidentiality is important as you will be working closely with people with whom a trusting relationship is vital. Throughout, it is expected that a collaborative, negotiation based approach will be employed with individuals and families. This workforce competence applies to those who work closely with individuals and/or families to address issues that affect their mental health. This is likely to be a process that takes place over some time and requires the worker to develop effective working relationships with the individuals and families with whom they work.

40. Enable individuals and families to put informed choices for optimising their mental health and social well-being into action This competence is about enabling individuals and families to put their informed choices for optimising the mental health and social well-being into action, and reviewing the effectiveness of their actions.This workforce competence applies to those who work closely with individuals and/or families to address issues that affect their mental health. This is likely to be a process that takes place over some time and requires the worker to develop effective working relationships with the individuals and families with whom they work.

41 Empower people with mental health needs to represent their views and organise their own support, assistance or action This workforce competence is about encouraging and supporting individuals to represent their own views and organise their own support, assistance or action related to accessing and utilising networks within the community. At the centre of the workforce competence is the right of people with mental health needs to full social inclusion and the workforce competence covers the role that service providers can play in facilitating this, empowering and enabling people with mental health needs to participate to the extent that they wish. This workforce competence applies to those who work to promote the social inclusion of people with mental health needs within mainstream communities.

42. Enable people with mental health needs to participate in social, economic and cultural activities and networks This competence is about encouraging and supporting individuals to participate in social, economic and cultural activities and networks within the community. At the centre of the workforce competence is the right of people with mental health needs to full social inclusion and the workforce competence covers the role that service providers can play in facilitating this, empowering and enabling people with mental health needs to participate to the extent that they wish. This workforce competence applies to those who work to promote the social inclusion of people with mental health needs within mainstream communities.

43. Challenge injustice and inequalities in access to mainstream provision for people with mental health needs This workforce competence is about challenging injustice and inequalities in access to mainstream services for people with mental health needs. At the centre of the workforce competence is the right of people with mental health needs to full social inclusion and the workforce competence covers the role that service providers can play in facilitating this, empowering and enabling people with mental health needs to participate to the extent that they wish. This workforce competence applies to those who work to promote the social inclusion of people with mental health needs within mainstream communities.

44. Promote peoples’ rights and encourage them to recognise their responsibilities This workforce competence is about recognising and enabling people's right to make informed decisions, enabling them to be involved in decision making to the full extent of their capability, supporting them in taking responsibility for their decisions and actions and protecting their right to confidentiality of information. Individuals' rights to make their own decisions will depend on their age and capacity. Children and young people should be helped to make informed choices consistent with their age and ability to understand the issues concerned and their views should be sought and taken seriously even when they may not yet have the legal right to make decisions for themselves.A key principle of the law is that every adult has the right to make their own decisions and is assumed to have the capacity to do so unless it is proved otherwise. Some people may need help or support to be able to understand the decision they are being asked to make, to know how to make a choice or to be able to communicate, but the need for help and support does not remove their right to make their own decisions.This workforce competence applies to anyone who works in the mental health sector and who has responsibility and accountability for promoting people's rights and responsibilities. This is particularly relevant to those who work with individuals who need support to make decisions.

45. Enable people with mental health needs to develop coping strategiesThis workforce competence covers working with individuals to recognise the impact of their behaviour on others and to jointly develop and evaluate strategies for changing behavioural responses where appropriate. The workforce competence is based on the concept of empowerment and supporting the individual as they develop strategies to cope with aspects of their behaviour which are inappropriate. This workforce competence applies to those who are responsible for supporting individuals who display inappropriate behavioural responses, supporting them, in a consistent manner, and promoting the motivation to develop and sustain alternative coping strategies. The workforce competence is suitable for those working in general mental health service provision but may be particularly relevant for those practitioners working with detained clients, in forensic workforce competences, prisons or in assertive outreach contexts.

45. Support people in relation to personal and social interactions and environmental factors This competence covers establishing supportive relationships and offering support to people when needed by relating to each person as someone with their own particular needs and concerns and developing relationships with them which take that into account.. The term ‘people' in this workforce competence is taken to mean anyone with whom you come into contact whether they are service users, carers or family members. Confidentiality is an important value underpinning this workforce competence, since a trusting relationship is at its heartThe kind of support offered will be dependent on the needs of the individual but is likely to include emotional support within social and personal interactions and practical support in dealing with environmental factors with which the individual might have difficulty coping on their own.This workforce competence applies to anyone who works in the mental health sector in a role which requires them to provide individual support to service users in relation to their personal and social interactions with others.

47. Enable individuals, their family and friends to explore and manage change This competence covers supporting individuals, their family and friends through the process of change, by enabling them to explore the implications of change, the options open to them and managing the process of change. The support provided will be over a number of interactions rather than in a one-off encounter.Due to the focus on change, it is important that you take full account of the personal beliefs and preferences of individuals and how their exploration and management of change will be affected by their cultural background and developmental stage, previous experience or statutory involvement. There is also an emphasis on enabling and exploring choice and the need to maintain confidentiality.This workforce competence applies to those who support individuals and their family and friends to cope with change. The standards described in this workforce competence are designed to be applicable to all individuals, and significant others, (their family and friends,) who need to explore and manage change. It is intended to be applicable in all settings in the care sector where this happens.

48. Work with people to identify their needs for safety, support and engagement and how these needs can best be addressed This competence covers identifying people's needs for safety, support and engagement in relation to promoting mental health. It involves gathering and collating information relevant to their needs and personal circumstances, evaluating and reviewing these needs and presenting the outcomes of the review to others including the people concerned and resource holders. The people concerned may be individuals, families, carers, groups or communities and their needs for safety, support and engagement may relate to community, family or mental health service settings or contexts, e.g. in relation to care in the community, caring for a family member with mental health needs, residential care, GP or out-patient waiting rooms, day care or inpatient settings.This workforce competence applies to anyone who works in the mental health sector in a role which requires them to identify peoples' needs for safety, support and engagement in relation to developing settings and contexts that promote mental health and to determine the best ways of addressing these needs.

49. Enable people who are a risk to themselves and others to develop control This workforce competence covers challenging behaviour that causes problems to the individual or others and helping individuals to develop a greater degree of understanding and control within agreed boundaries of behaviour. This workforce competence is about challenging behaviours and helping to develop control through day-to-day interactions with individuals. Developing and implementing therapeutic programmes to enable individuals to manage their behaviour is covered in workforce competence E1.This workforce competence applies to those who work with individuals with mental health needs who are at risk to themselves or others because of their behaviour. The behaviour may be aggressive, abusive or criminal.

50. Identify trends and changes in the mental health and mental health needs of a population and the effectiveness of different means of meeting their needs This workforce competence covers the first phase of the commissioning process - the identification of trends and changes in the mental health needs of a population and the effectiveness of different means of meeting those needs. The end of the process is agreeing and summarising the information available so that it can be prioritised and objectives set - this is described in workforce competence 51. The practitioner is not expected to gather and analyse primary data but will draw from information which is available, influence how data is gathered in the future and may initiate further data gathering exercises to supplement and complement the data which is available.The commissioning process is built on a number of principles. These include equity of provision through targeting resources at those most in need, participation of the population in identifying their needs, and evaluating the effectiveness of the means of meeting those needs. Practitioners need to keep an open mind and be alert to areas where needs may be changing or where current means of meeting needs are failing to serve the requirements of some section of the population. Note that ‘a population' may refer to a local or geographical area or a group of people with specific needs which can be dealt with together, for example those with schizophrenia. This workforce competence applies to anyone who has the responsibility of working with others to identify and agree trends and changes in the mental health needs of a population, whether this be at national, regional or local level.

51. Develop and agree priorities and objectives for meeting the mental health needs of a population This competence covers the development and agreement of priorities and objectives to meet the mental health needs of a population - the second phase of the commissioning process. The commissioning process is built on a number of principles. These include equity of provision through targeting resources at those most in need, participation of the population in identifying their needs, and evaluating the effectiveness of the means of meeting those needs. Practitioners need to keep an open mind and be alert to areas where needs may be changing or where current means of meeting needs are failing to serve the requirements of some section of the population. Note that ‘a population' may refer to a local or geographical area or a group of people with specific needs which can be dealt with together, for example those with schizophrenia.This workforce competence applies to anyone who has the responsibility, with others, for developing and agreeing priorities and objectives to meet the mental health needs of a population, whether this be at national, regional or local level.

52. Develop and agree strategies to meet the mental health needs of a population This competence covers the development and agreement of strategies to meet the identified mental health needs of a population - the third phase of the commissioning process.The commissioning process is built on a number of principles. These include equity of provision through targeting resources at those most in need, participation of the population in identifying their needs, and evaluating the effectiveness of the means of meeting those needs. Practitioners need to keep an open mind and be alert to areas where needs may be changing or where current means of meeting needs are failing to serve the requirements of some section of the population. Note that ‘a population' may refer to a local or geographical area or a group of people with specific needs which can be dealt with together, for example those with schizophrenia.This workforce competence applies to anyone who has the responsibility of working with others to develop, implement and improve strategies to meet the mental health needs of a population, whether this be at national, regional or local level.

53. Implement strategies to meet the mental health needs of a population This competence covers the implementation of strategies to meet the identified mental health needs of a population - the third phase of the commissioning process.The commissioning process is built on a number of principles. These include equity of provision through targeting resources at those most in need, participation of the population in identifying their needs, and evaluating the effectiveness of the means of meeting those needs. Practitioners need to keep an open mind and be alert to areas where needs may be changing or where current means of meeting needs are failing to serve the requirements of some section of the population. Note that ‘a population' may refer to a local or geographical area or a group of people with specific needs which can be dealt with together, for example those with schizophrenia.This workforce competence applies to anyone who has the responsibility of working with others to develop, implement and improve strategies to meet the mental health needs of a population, whether this be at national, regional or local level.

54. Monitor, evaluate and improve strategies to meet the mental health needs of a population This competence covers the monitoring, evaluation and improvement of strategies to meet the identified mental health needs of a population - the third phase of the commissioning process.The commissioning process is built on a number of principles. These include equity of provision through targeting resources at those most in need, participation of the population in identifying their needs, and evaluating the effectiveness of the means of meeting those needs. Practitioners need to keep an open mind and be alert to areas where needs may be changing or where current means of meeting needs are failing to serve the requirements of some section of the population. Note that ‘a population' may refer to a local or geographical area or a group of people with specific needs which can be dealt with together, for example those with schizophrenia.This workforce competence applies to anyone who has the responsibility of working with others to develop, implement and improve strategies to meet the mental health needs of a population, whether this be at national, regional or local level.

55. Assess the needs of the population to determine those who require, or would benefit from, mental health services SummaryThis workforce competence covers assessing the needs of the population to determine those who require, or would benefit from, mental health servicesThe population is likely to be at regional or local level. It might include everyone in a geographical area who needs mental health services or it may be focused on the mental health services for a particular client group, such as children and adolescents, adults or the elderly.The planning of services is based on the identification of the needs of those whom they are designed to serve and is based on a number of principles. These include equity of provision through targeting resources at those most in need, participation of the population in identifying their needs, and evaluating the effectiveness of the means of meeting those needs. Practitioners need to keep an open mind and be alert to areas where needs may be changing or where current means of meeting needs are failing to serve the requirements of some section of the population. One of the key values in this workforce competence is the need to ensure that the population has the opportunity, and is enabled, to feed their views and concerns into the planning process. This workforce competence describes standards at the operational service provider level.This workforce competence applies to anyone who has the responsibility for undertaking service planning in a provider role to meet the mental health needs of a population.

56. Prioritise mental health interventions against available resources and the needs of the population This workforce competence covers prioritising interventions for the delivery of mental health services for a population. The population is likely to be at regional or local level. It might include everyone in a geographical area who needs mental health services or it may be focused on the mental health services for a particular client group, such as children and adolescents, adults or the elderly.The planning of services is based on the identification of the needs of those whom they are designed to serve and is based on a number of principles. These include equity of provision through targeting resources at those most in need, participation of the population in identifying their needs, and evaluating the effectiveness of the means of meeting those needs. Practitioners need to keep an open mind and be alert to areas where needs may be changing or where current means of meeting needs are failing to serve the requirements of some section of the population. One of the key values in this workforce competence is the need to ensure that the population has the opportunity, and is enabled, to feed their views and concerns into the planning process. This workforce competence describes standards at the operational service provider level.This workforce competence applies to anyone who has the responsibility for undertaking service planning in a provider role to meet the mental health needs of a population.

57. Monitor, evaluate and improve processes for delivering mental health services to a population This workforce competence covers the monitoring, evaluation and improvement of processes for prioritising the delivery of mental health services for a population. The population is likely to be at regional or local level. It might include everyone in a geographical area who needs mental health services or it may be focused on the mental health services for a particular client group, such as children and adolescents, adults or the elderly.The planning of services is based on the identification of the needs of those whom they are designed to serve and is based on a number of principles. These include equity of provision through targeting resources at those most in need, participation of the population in identifying their needs, and evaluating the effectiveness of the means of meeting those needs. Practitioners need to keep an open mind and be alert to areas where needs may be changing or where current means of meeting needs are failing to serve the requirements of some section of the population. One of the key values in this workforce competence is the need to ensure that the population has the opportunity, and is enabled, to feed their views and concerns into the planning process. This workforce competence describes standards at the operational service provider level.This workforce competence applies to anyone who has the responsibility for undertaking service planning in a provider role to meet the mental health needs of a population.

58. Determine the concerns and priorities of communities about mental health and mental health needs This workforce competence covers determining the concerns and priorities of the range of diverse communities in the local area with which you are concerned. Communities are neighbourhoods, communities of interest (for example, business communities) and communities of identity (for example, minority ethnic groups, young people, lesbian and gay people). The purpose of determining concerns and priorities is to: a) inform your organisation's plans and strategies for promoting mental health and addressing mental health needs b) meet legislative and other requirements for the development of mental health strategies and servicesc) promote the principles of best value and best practice. The workforce competence addresses the research needed before consultation can begin, the selection of appropriate consultation methods, carrying out the consultation and ensuring that full use can be made of the information gathered. The workforce competence emphasises the importance of evidence based practice, evaluation, working in collaboration with other agencies and/or multi-agency groups and of reaching all communities within an area, including those that are often marginalised such as minority ethnic groups and people with mental health problems.This workforce competence applies to anyone who consults communities about their concerns and priorities in relation to mental health and mental health needs. This is likely to be a specialist role.

59 Work with groups and communities to develop policies, strategies and services to improve mental health and address mental health needs This workforce competence covers involving groups and communities as active partners and empowering them to improve their own mental health and address their mental health needs. This calls for effective communication and strategies for enabling groups and communities to play an active, partnership role. The fundamental principle of empowerment runs through this workforce competence and calls for you to support this in your actions and approach towards working with groups and communities.This workforce competence applies to anyone who works in the mental health sector in a role which specifically requires them to work with groups and communities in the development of policies, strategies and services to improve mental health and address mental health needs. This is likely to be a specialist role.

60. Enable groups, communities and organisations to determine and plan how to address their issues and concerns This workforce competence covers enabling groups, communities and organisations to address issues which affect their health and social well-being. This involves enabling people to determine their own issues and concerns and working with them as they plan how to address these. The role is not to set the agenda for the people with whom you are working but to be there as a resource, meeting the needs of the community, organisation or group as it sees fit. This would include encouraging people to take realistic steps so that they can see their achievements and evaluate areas of success. Good practice also suggests that the organisation, community or group should be enabled to evaluate, review and modify their plans in the light of their experiences so that they are able to learn and progress.The focus within this workforce competence is that the work of the practitioner should be driven by the concerns and issues of the community, organisation and group with whom they are working. This means in effect that your role needs to be negotiated and renegotiated with the community, organisation or group as the work proceeds, with the agenda and role being driven by the needs and concerns of the people involved. You need to be able to manage any tensions between your own issues, concerns and values, those of the people with whom you are working and those of the agency for which you are working. There is the potential for conflict with the employing or commissioning agency. The approach promoted within this workforce competence is non-directive, enabling and collaborative.This workforce competence applies to any mental health practitioner who works with organisations, communities and groups using organisational development or community development approaches to enable them to address issues which affect their mental health. It is also likely to be applicable to those whose roles cover consultative and consumer issues, such as the work of Community Health Councils.

61. Act as a resource to groups, communities and organisations as they address their issues and concerns around mental healthThis workforce competence covers enabling groups, communities and organisations to address issues which affect their health and social well-being. This involves enabling people to determine their own issues and concerns and working with them as they plan how to address these. The role is not to set the agenda for the people with whom you are working but to be there as a resource, meeting the needs of the community, organisation or group as it sees fit. This would include encouraging people to take realistic steps so that they can see their achievements and evaluate areas of success. Good practice also suggests that the organisation, community or group should be enabled to evaluate, review and modify their plans in the light of their experiences so that they are able to learn and progress.The focus within this workforce competence is that the work of the practitioner should be driven by the concerns and issues of the community, organisation and group with whom they are working. This means in effect that your role needs to be negotiated and renegotiated with the community, organisation or group as the work proceeds, with the agenda and role being driven by the needs and concerns of the people involved. You need to be able to manage any tensions between your own issues, concerns and values, those of the people with whom you are working and those of the agency for which you are working. There is the potential for conflict with the employing or commissioning agency. The approach promoted within this workforce competence is non-directive, enabling and collaborative.This workforce competence applies to any mental health practitioner who works with organisations, communities and groups using organisational development or community development approaches to enable them to address issues which affect their mental health. It is also likely to be applicable to those whose roles cover consultative and consumer issues, such as the work of Community Health Councils.

62. Determine the concerns and priorities of individuals and families in relation to their mental health and mental health needsThis workforce competence covers determining the concerns, interest and priorities of individuals and families in relation to their mental health and mental health needs. Following this identification the practitioner is required to find out about how others have addressed these issues elsewhere so that they may build on the experience of others and learn from others' practice. This workforce competence applies to those who work with a range of individuals and families to determine the concerns and priorities they have about mental health and mental health

63. Work with individuals and families to develop services to improve their mental health and address their mental health needs This competence covers actively enabling and encouraging individuals and families to take a full and active part in decision making processes about developing mental health services.

64. Establish with groups, communities and organisations their interests, concerns and priorities and enable them to identify acceptable representation This competence covers the role of the practitioner in establishing the interests and concerns of groups, communities and organisations, helping them to prioritise, to identify when representation is required and to identify acceptable representation to meet their needs. This workforce competence applies to any practitioner who represents, groups, communities and organisations when they are not able to do so themselves. This is a specialist role.

65. Act on behalf of groups, communities and organisations when they are not able to represent their interests, concerns and priorities This workforce competence covers the role of the practitioner when they are acting as a representative for an organisation, community or group. The term ‘representative' has been used deliberately to distinguish the more extensive skills and action which would be undertaken by a community advocate. The reason for the representation is likely to be because the practitioner has access to a broader range of situation and settings than the group and community concerned, such as in policy setting and commissioning. To represent interests effectively, the practitioner would need to have established their interests, concerns and priorities, act on their behalf when they are not able to do so themselves (often because they are not present) and enable them to monitor and evaluate the representation and find alternative longer term solutions. This workforce competence applies to any practitioner who represents, groups, communities and organisations when they are not able to do so themselves. This is a specialist role.

66. Assess how environments and practices can be maintained and improved to promote mental health This competence covers assessing how environments and practices can be maintained and improved to promote mental health. This involves identifying all those with a stake in the environments and practices and consulting with them about their requirements and expectationsThe environments may be homes (e.g. private, supported housing, care homes), workplaces, public places (e.g. hospitals, health centres, day centres, play or youth facilities), or the broader environment such as towns, housing estates and the countryside. Environments will also cover social, cultural and aesthetic aspects as well as physical aspects and the interaction of people with their environment, i.e. the ecological environment.The term ‘practices' is used to describe significant activities which take place within the environment, including:a) how the environment is used, e.g. working or domestic practices, therapeutic activities, public access and use, routine activitiesb) interpersonal relationshipsc) initiatives that will increase the capacity of those who live in, work in or otherwise use the environment to promote mental health and well-being.This workforce competence applies to anyone who works in the mental health sector in a role which requires them to assess environments and practices to determine how they can be maintained and improved to promote mental health.

67. Encourage stakeholders to see the value of improving environments and practices to promote mental health This competence covers encouraging stakeholders to see the value of improving environments and practices. The environments may be homes (e.g. private, supported housing, care homes), workplaces, public places (e.g. hospitals, health centres, day centres, play or youth facilities), or the broader environment such as towns, housing estates and the countryside. Environments will also cover social, cultural and aesthetic aspects as well as physical aspects and the interaction of people with their environment, i.e. the ecological environment.The term ‘practices' is used to describe significant activities which take place within the environment, including:a) how the environment is used, e.g. working or domestic practices, therapeutic activities, public access and use, routine activitiesb) interpersonal relationshipsc) initiatives that will increase the capacity of those who live in, work in or otherwise use the environment to promote mental health and well-being.This workforce competence applies to anyone who works in the mental health sector in a role in which they need to gain the support of stakeholders to improve environments and practices to promote mental health.

68. Develop action plans which assist stakeholders in improving environments and practices to promote mental health This competence covers gaining the support of stakeholders to improve environments and practices and facilitating action to do so. This involves encouraging stakeholders to see the value of improving environments and practices and working with them to develop action plans to determine how to do it. The environments may be homes (e.g. private, supported housing, care homes), workplaces, public places (e.g. hospitals, health centres, day centres, play or youth facilities), or the broader environment such as towns, housing estates and the countryside. Environments will also cover social, cultural and aesthetic aspects as well as physical aspects and the interaction of people with their environment, i.e. the ecological environment.The term ‘practices' is used to describe significant activities which take place within the environment, including:a) how the environment is used, e.g. working or domestic practices, therapeutic activities, public access and use, routine activitiesb) interpersonal relationshipsc) initiatives that will increase the capacity of those who live in, work in or otherwise use the environment to promote mental health and well-being.This workforce competence applies to anyone who works in the mental health sector in a role in which they need to gain the support of stakeholders to improve environments and practices to promote mental health.

69. Support stakeholders in improving environments and practices to promote mental health This competence covers encouraging and supporting stakeholders to implement action plans to improve environments and practices.The support may be provided in a variety of ways, such as information, advice, training, coaching, representation and accessing expertise and/or resources. The environments may be homes (e.g. private, supported housing, care homes), workplaces, public places (e.g. hospitals, health centres, day centres, play or youth facilities), or the broader environment such as towns, housing estates and the countryside. Environments will also cover social, cultural and aesthetic aspects as well as physical aspects and the interaction of people with their environment, i.e. the ecological environment.The term ‘practices' is used to describe significant activities which take place within the environment, including:a) how the environment is used, e.g. working or domestic practices, therapeutic activities, public access and use, routine activitiesb) interpersonal relationshipsc) initiatives that will increase the capacity of those who live in, work in or otherwise use the environment to promote mental health and well-being.This workforce competence applies to anyone who works in the mental health sector in a role in which they need to gain the support of stakeholders to improve environments and practices to promote mental health.

70 Monitor and review changes in environments and practices to promote mental health This workforce competence covers monitoring changes in environments and practices themselves, changes in mental health as a result of changes to environments and practices and the effectiveness of different strategies for improving environments and practices (e.g. policy formulation, training). The environments may be homes (e.g. private, supported housing, care homes), workplaces, public places (e.g. hospitals, health centres, day centres, play or youth facilities), or the broader environment such as towns, housing estates and the countryside. Environments will also cover social, cultural and aesthetic aspects as well as physical aspects and the interaction of people with their environment, i.e. the ecological environment.The term ‘practices' is used to describe significant activities which take place within the environment, including:a) how the environment is used, e.g. working or domestic practices, therapeutic activities, public access and use, routine activitiesb) interpersonal relationshipsc) initiatives that will increase the capacity of those who live in, work in or otherwise use the environment to promote mental health and well-being.This workforce competence applies to anyone who works in the mental health sector in a role which requires them to monitor and review changes in environments and practices, whether they are working on their own or as part of a team.

71. Raise stakeholders’ awareness of the value of employment, training and education for people with mental health needs This workforce competence covers working with a variety of stakeholders to promote the value of employment, training and education for people with mental health needs and negotiating in broad terms what opportunities they could offer.This workforce competence applies to those in statutory or voluntary agencies who seek to promote and negotiate employment, training and education opportunities for individuals with mental health needs.

72. Negotiate and agree with stakeholders the opportunities they are willing to offer to people with mental health needs This workforce competence covers negotiating and agreeing with a variety of stakeholders the opportunities they are willing to offer people with mental health needs.This workforce competence applies to those in statutory or voluntary agencies who seek to promote and negotiate employment, training and education opportunities for individuals with mental health needs.

73 Negotiate with employers and others and agree placements for individuals with mental health needs This workforce competence covers organising the provision of employment for individuals with mental health needs. This workforce competence applies to those who seek to negotiate and set up employment opportunities for individuals with mental health needs.The term ‘employment opportunities' has been used to indicate the range of ways in which individuals may gain access to employment and improve their employability, including full and part time employment, short term contracts, voluntary work, placement within training schemes and work experience schemes. Schemes may be national or local initiatives.

74. Support employers and others in their work with individuals with mental health This competence covers supporting the provision of employment for individuals with mental health needs. This workforce competence applies to those who seek to maintain employment opportunities for individuals with mental health needs.The term ‘employment opportunities' has been used to indicate the range of ways in which individuals may gain access to employment and improve their employability, including full and part time employment, short term contracts, voluntary work, placement within training schemes and work experience schemes. Schemes may be national or local initiatives.

75. Raise stakeholders’ awareness of the housing needs of people with mental health needs This competence covers making sure that those in positions of influence with regard to housing opportunities are fully aware of and take account of the requirements of people with mental health needs in planning and allocating provision. Housing opportunities include opportunities for affordable housing, housing association properties, accommodation for rent in the private and public sectors, supported housing, community housing and residential care places. Housing opportunities may be needed to cater for those individuals with mental health needs who are actively seeking accommodation as a result of homelessness or as a result of changing accommodation needs.This workforce competence applies to those in statutory or voluntary agencies who seek to raise stakeholders' awareness of the housing needs of individuals with mental health needs.

76. Negotiate and agree with stakeholders the housing opportunities they are willing to offer to people with mental health needs This competence covers negotiating, influencing and agreeing with those in positions of influence with regard to the housing opportunities they are willing to offer to people with mental health needs. Housing opportunities include opportunities for affordable housing, housing association properties, accommodation for rent in the private and public sectors, supported housing, community housing and residential care places. Housing opportunities may be needed to cater for those individuals with mental health needs who are actively seeking accommodation as a result of homelessness or as a result of changing accommodation needs.This workforce competence applies to those in statutory or voluntary agencies who seek to promote and negotiate housing opportunities for individuals with mental health needs.

77. Raise stakeholders’ awareness of the value of leisure activities for people with mental health needs This competence covers promoting opportunities for people with mental needs to participate in leisure activities by raise stakeholders' awareness of the value of leisure activities. Leisure opportunities include activities related to hobbies, interests, sports (as a spectator or participant), entertainment (e.g. access to the theatre or visiting theatre groups), socialising (e.g. eating out, talking to others about the old days). They may take place within or outside of the care environment. This workforce competence is concerned with recreation and leisure in the sense of keeping one's mind and body active, not for specific therapeutic purposes. This workforce competence applies to those in statutory or voluntary agencies who seek to raise stakeholders' awareness of the value of leisure activities for individuals with mental health needs.

78. Negotiate and agree with stakeholders the leisure opportunities they are willing to offer to people with mental health needsThis workforce competence covers negotiating and agreeing with stakeholders the leisure opportunities they are willing to offer to people with mental health needs Leisure opportunities include activities related to hobbies, interests, sports (as a spectator or participant), entertainment (e.g. access to the theatre or visiting theatre groups), socialising (e.g. eating out, talking to others about the old days). They may take place within or outside of the care environment. This workforce competence is concerned with recreation and leisure in the sense of keeping one's mind and body active, not for specific therapeutic purposes. This workforce competence applies to those in statutory or voluntary agencies who seek to negotiate and agree with stakeholder the leisure opportunities they are willing to offer individuals with mental health needs.

79. Enable workers and agencies to work collaboratively This workforce competence covers enabling practitioners and agencies to work collaboratively to improve mental health. The practitioners and agencies may be within the mental health sector itself, such as social services, health services and related private and voluntary organisations. They may also be much broader than this and include private service employers, education services, housing, criminal/youth justice and other forms of public services. The workforce competence to work effectively within multi-disciplinary and multi-agency teams is an important dimension in providing effective mental health services.This workforce competence applies to practitioners who have special responsibility within their work role for facilitating collaborative working between workers and agencies.Such a role is likely to be undertaken by those who are not working in front-line contact with users of services but rather by those who support practitioners who do. It is therefore likely to be of relevance to those who work in, or are involved with, national agencies such as professional bodies or health promotion agencies; those who hold particular responsibility within services at regional or local level in relation to inter-agency collaboration; and those who take on such roles in a voluntary capacity. It is also relevant to those who undertake such a role within agencies through working across a number of practitioner groups. It may also be applicable more generally, to those involved in education and training, and those who work in commissioning.

80. Explore, initiate and develop collaborative working relationships This competence covers exploring and assessing the potential for collaborative working and then initiating and developing those relationships. It is based on the initial stages of an action development cycle covering the stages of exploring and assessing the potential for collaborative working (including the effect of past history on the relationship), the development of relationships and arrangements, sustaining and maintaining those relationships, and then reviewing and evaluating collaborative working to modify and develop it.This workforce competence applies to any practitioner involved in joint working relationships and arrangements, be they at the level of neighbourhood and community, district, town, city and county, regional, national or international.This workforce competence describes occupational practice for those actually engaged in collaborative working either between practitioners in the same agency or with other agencies. Workforce competence N1 describes the practice standards for those who facilitate the process of collaborative working.

81. Sustain and review collaborative working This competence covers sustaining and maintaining collaborative working relationships, and then reviewing and evaluating collaborative working to modify and develop it. It is based on the latter stages of an action development cycle with the stages of exploring and assessing the potential for collaborative working (including the effect of past history on the relationship), the development of relationships and arrangements, sustaining and maintaining those relationships, and then reviewing and evaluating collaborative working to modify and develop it.This workforce competence applies to any practitioner involved in joint working relationships and arrangements be they at the level of neighbourhood and community, district, town, city and county, regional, national or international.This workforce competence describes occupational practice for those actually engaged in collaborative working either between practitioners in the same agency or with other agencies. Workforce competence N1 describes practice standards for those who facilitate the process of collaborative working.

82. Develop and sustain effective working relationships with staff in other agencies This competence is about developing and sustaining effective working relationships with staff in other agencies. This involves acknowledging and respecting the different perspectives which others may bring and collaborating with them effectively to the benefit of the service user.The agencies concerned may be within the mental health sector and/or from other sectors such as police, probation, prisons, youth justice, housing, youth and community, education.This workforce competence applies to workers involved in joint working with staff in other agencies, whether this is within formal partnership arrangements or informally and ad hoc. The workforce competence is designed specifically for those who are not expected to set up effective working agreements from scratch (covered in workforce competences MH79 and HSC3100) but are expected to contribute to optimising the value of them.

83. Work with others to facilitate the transfer of individuals between agencies or services This competence covers working with staff in other agencies and services to ensure individuals experience a seamless transition between agencies and services. In the context of this workforce competence the term ‘transfer' covers all types of referral and shared responsibility for individuals, including:a) where individuals are transferred to another agency/service on a long-term or permanent basisb) where individuals are transferred to another agency/service for specific short-term interventionsc) where the agencies/services concerned have shared responsibility for the care and treatment of individualsd) where the ‘receiving' agency/service provides advice and guidance to the referring agency/service which remains responsible for the care and treatment of the individual.This workforce competence applies to those who work with others to facilitate the transfer of individuals between agencies and services. This role may be carried out for an agency/service which refers to and/or accepts referrals from other agencies/services. The job holder will be responsible for managing boundary issues between the agencies or services concerned and may or may not be directly involved in individual transfers.

84. Lead the development of inter-agency services for addressing mental health needs This workforce competence covers supporting and leading the development teams of people involved in delivering inter-agency services. It covers planning, negotiation and agreeing work plans with both service users and providers. This workforce competence applies to those who are responsible for developing inter-agency services for addressing mental health needs. The nature of the workforce competence assumes that the person has management responsibility for the inter-agency services.

85. Lead the implementation of inter-agency services for addressing mental health needs This competence covers supporting and leading the implementation inter-agency services for addressing mental health needs. It covers supporting and encouraging those undertaking the work, including both service users and providers where relevant. This workforce competence applies to those who are responsible for implementing inter-agency services for addressing mental health needs. The nature of the workforce competence assumes that the person has management responsibility for the inter-agency services.

86. Monitor, evaluate and improve inter-agency services for addressing mental health needs This competence covers monitoring, evaluating and leading teams to improve delivering inter-agency services for addressing mental health needs. It covers evaluating the quality of work with both service users and providers. This workforce competence applies to those who are responsible for improving inter-agency services for addressing mental health needs. The nature of the workforce competence assumes that the person has management responsibility for the inter-agency services.

87. Assess the need for, and plan awareness raising of mental health issues This competence covers co-ordinating initiatives and programmes to raise awareness of mental health issues. It particularly covers assessing the need for awareness raising, determining the groups who are to be at the focus of the work and developing plans for awareness raising. The standards within this workforce competence are based on the belief that it is only possible to raise awareness of mental health issues if there is prior learning about the concerns, issues and priorities of the target group and the context of their lives. It is also based on evidence that awareness raising is usually most effective when it is integrated across agencies and practitioners so that there is a co-ordinated approach and message. This also leads to better targeting of resources. Awareness raising is also considered to be most effective when health and social well-being is viewed holistically.This workforce competence applies to anyone who has responsibility for co-ordinating awareness raising of mental health issues, no matter their location or employing agency. The focus of the activity may be those whose mental health is the subject of the awareness raising or those who may provide access to those who are the focus of the awareness raising (such as school governors, health and social care practitioners, prison governors).

88. Support the implementation, monitoring, evaluation and improvement of awareness raising around mental health issues This workforce competence covers co-ordinating initiatives and programmes to raise awareness of mental health issues. It particularly covers supporting implementation; and monitoring, evaluating and improving awareness raising in the future.The standards within this workforce competence are based on the belief that it is only possible to raise awareness of mental health issues if there is prior learning about the concerns, issues and priorities of the target group and the context of their lives. It is also based on evidence that awareness raising is usually most effective when it is integrated across agencies and practitioners so that there is a co-ordinated approach and message. This also leads to better targeting of resources. Awareness raising is also considered to be most effective when health and social well-being is viewed holistically.This workforce competence applies to anyone who has responsibility for co-ordinating awareness raising of mental health issues, no matter their location or employing agency. The focus of the activity may be those whose mental health is the subject of the awareness raising or those who may provide access to those who are the focus of the awareness raising (such as school governors, health and social care practitioners, prison governors).

89. Project manage action targeted at addressing mental health issues This workforce competence is about community-based projects planned and implemented by mental health services in response to the identified needs, concerns and interests of communities and groups. Such projects are usually part of a change strategy for communities which have been directly identified by the initiative of practitioners. The aims and objectives of the practitioners need to be justified. Whilst this workforce competence describes standards for mental health projects which are to be implemented by mental health practitioners, the values on which it is based are respect for the rights and views of those for whom the project is intended, to enable those involved to be as self-managing and self-directed as possible through their involvement in the project. The purpose of such projects is usually to promote mental health as a holistic and positive concept.This workforce competence applies to any practitioner who has the task of managing mental health projects to address the needs and concerns of groups and communities.

90. Support others in understanding people’s mental health needs and how these can be addressed in their work This workforce competence covers supporting others in understanding people's mental health needs and contributing to the improvement of people's mental health. You are likely to be working with people in other agencies or services who are not mental health practitioners but who work with people with or at risk of developing mental health needs. The people and agencies with whom you have contact and may need to support in developing their understanding of mental health issues, may be within other areas of health or social care, e.g. medical teams, residential homes, or may be within other sectors, e.g. prison service, police, youth justice. The standards would also be relevant to working with other individuals, such as the families or carers of people with mental health needs. This workforce competence applies to mental health practitioners who seek to develop the knowledge and practice of others about mental health and related needs and issues.

91. Work with teams and agencies to review progress and performance and identify next steps This competence covers assisting teams and agencies to plan and carry forward learning and development by giving guidance and support in reviewing progress and agreeing further learning needs and how they might address these.This workforce competence applies to those people whose role gives them responsibility for reviewing the progress and performance of teams or agencies. They are likely to hold a senior practitioner or management role and may or may not have line responsibility for the team or agency.

92. Support and challenge teams and agencies on specific aspects of their practice This competence covers supporting the personal and professional development of teams and agencies by enabling them to reflect on their values, priorities and interests when they are undertaking different aspects of their work and supporting them in evaluating their own effectiveness. This workforce competence applies to senior practitioners and managers with additional experience and expertise. They may be employed as a service co-ordinator or professional manager. They will not necessarily have line management responsibility for those whom they are supporting and challenging.

93. Support and challenge workers on specific aspects of their practice This competence covers supporting the personal and professional development of others and monitoring the effectiveness of their practice. This workforce competence applies to senior practitioners with additional experience and expertise. They may be employed as team leader, service co-ordinator, senior worker or case manager. They will not necessarily have line management responsibility for those whom they are supporting and challenging.

94. Enable people to recover from mental illness/distress, take control of their lives and achieve self-agency This competence is about enabling individuals to recover from distressing mental health experiences through the acquisition of recovery based knowledge, practice and skills. At the centre of the competence is the Personal Recovery or Wellness Recovery Action Plan (WRAP) that is a self-management approach to creating and maintaining mental well-being. It is a system developed and used successfully by people with a variety of distressing emotional and mental experiences. The system involves enabling them to gain the inspiration and support to begin their journeys of recovery using self-determination, self-management, and Personal Recovery Plans, including Wellness Recovery Action Planning, in the achievement of self-agency.This competence applies to all those who work to promote the recovery of people diagnosed with mental illness within statutory, voluntary and private sector organisations and the community.

95. Interact with individuals using telecommunications This workforce competence covers interacting with individuals using telecommunications. This involves establishing interactions with individuals using telecommunications, sustaining interactions with individuals using telecommunications, and ending interactions with individuals using telecommunications. The emphasis is on supportive interactions rather then providing a general advice service.

96. Procure services for individuals This workforce competence covers procuring specific health and social care services to meet the needs of individual service users. These services may be supplied outside the immediate geographical area. This involves being clear about the individual's requirements, identifying and contracting with suitable service providers, and ensuring that the services provided meet the required standard.


See alsoEdit


External linksEdit

[http://www.skillsforhealth.org.uk/tools/view_framework.php?id=62 List with associated pdfs)

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