Wikia

Psychology Wiki

Changes: Murray Barr

Edit

Back to page

(Created page with '{{Biopsy}} Murray L. Barr, M.D. '''Murray Llewellyn Barr''', OC, FRSC, FRS…')
 
 
Line 1: Line 1:
 
{{Biopsy}}
 
{{Biopsy}}
 
[[Image:barr-murray.jpg|126px|right|Murray L. Barr, M.D.]]
 
[[Image:barr-murray.jpg|126px|right|Murray L. Barr, M.D.]]
'''Murray Llewellyn Barr''', [[Order of Canada|OC]], [[Royal Society of Canada|FRSC]], [[Royal Society|FRS]] (June 20, 1908 &ndash; May 4, 1995) was a [[Canada|Canadian]] physician and medical researcher who discovered with graduate student Ewart George Bertram, in 1948, an important cell structure, the "[[Barr body]]".<ref name="barr 1949">{{cite journal |author=Barr ML, Bertram EG |month=April 30, |year=1949 |title=A morphological distinction between neurones of the male and female, and the behaviour of the nucleolar satellite during accelerated nucleoprotein synthesis |journal=[[Nature (journal)|Nature]] |volume=163 |issue=4148 |pages=676–7 |doi=10.1038/163676a0}}</ref>
+
'''Murray Llewellyn Barr''',OC], FRSC, [[Royal Society|FRS]] (June 20, 1908 &ndash; May 4, 1995) was a Canadian physician and medical researcher who discovered with graduate student Ewart George Bertram, in 1948, an important cell structure, the "[[Barr body]]".<ref name="barr 1949">{{cite journal |author=Barr ML, Bertram EG |month=April 30, |year=1949 |title=A morphological distinction between neurones of the male and female, and the behaviour of the nucleolar satellite during accelerated nucleoprotein synthesis |journal=[[Nature (journal)|Nature]] |volume=163 |issue=4148 |pages=676–7 |doi=10.1038/163676a0}}</ref>
   
Born in [[Belmont, Ontario]], he was educated at the [[University of Western Ontario]], where he received his B.A. in 1930, M.D. in 1933, and M.Sc. in 1938.
+
Born in Belmont, Ontario, he was educated at the University of Western Ontario], where he received his B.A. in 1930, M.D. in 1933, and M.Sc. in 1938.
   
 
He was nominated for the [[Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine]].
 
He was nominated for the [[Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine]].
   
In 1968, he was made an Officer of the [[Order of Canada]]. In 1959, he received the [[Royal Society of Canada]]'s [[Flavelle Medal]]. In 1962, he won a Joseph P. Kennedy Jr. Foundation Award for his contributions to the understanding of the causes of mental retardation. In 1963, he received the [[Gairdner Foundation International Award]] and in 1972 he was elected a fellow of the [[Royal Society]] of London. In 1998, he was posthumously inducted into [[Canadian Medical Hall of Fame]].
+
In 1968, he was made an Officer of the Order of Canada. In 1959, he received the Royal Society of Canada's Flavelle Medal. In 1962, he won a Joseph P. Kennedy Jr. Foundation Award for his contributions to the understanding of the causes of [[mental retardation]]. In 1963, he received the Gairdner Foundation International Award and in 1972 he was elected a fellow of the [[Royal Society]] of London. In 1998, he was posthumously inducted into Canadian Medical Hall of Fame.
   
 
==References==
 
==References==

Latest revision as of 19:12, April 11, 2010

Assessment | Biopsychology | Comparative | Cognitive | Developmental | Language | Individual differences | Personality | Philosophy | Social |
Methods | Statistics | Clinical | Educational | Industrial | Professional items | World psychology |

Biological: Behavioural genetics · Evolutionary psychology · Neuroanatomy · Neurochemistry · Neuroendocrinology · Neuroscience · Psychoneuroimmunology · Physiological Psychology · Psychopharmacology (Index, Outline)


Murray Llewellyn Barr,OC], FRSC, FRS (June 20, 1908 – May 4, 1995) was a Canadian physician and medical researcher who discovered with graduate student Ewart George Bertram, in 1948, an important cell structure, the "Barr body".[1]

Born in Belmont, Ontario, he was educated at the University of Western Ontario], where he received his B.A. in 1930, M.D. in 1933, and M.Sc. in 1938.

He was nominated for the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine.

In 1968, he was made an Officer of the Order of Canada. In 1959, he received the Royal Society of Canada's Flavelle Medal. In 1962, he won a Joseph P. Kennedy Jr. Foundation Award for his contributions to the understanding of the causes of mental retardation. In 1963, he received the Gairdner Foundation International Award and in 1972 he was elected a fellow of the Royal Society of London. In 1998, he was posthumously inducted into Canadian Medical Hall of Fame.

ReferencesEdit

  1. Barr ML, Bertram EG (April 30, 1949). A morphological distinction between neurones of the male and female, and the behaviour of the nucleolar satellite during accelerated nucleoprotein synthesis. Nature 163 (4148): 676–7.

External linksEdit



This page uses Creative Commons Licensed content from Wikipedia (view authors).

Around Wikia's network

Random Wiki