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Intergenerational relationships are the social and family relationships between memebers of different generations.

Intergenerationality is interaction between members of different generations. Sociologists study many intergenerational issues, including equity, conflict, and mobility:

  • Intergenerational equity is the concept or idea of fairness or justice in relationships between children, youth, adults and seniors, particularly in terms of treatment and interactions.
  • Intergenerational conflict is either a conflict situation between teenagers and adults or a more abstract conflict between two generations, which often involves all inclusive prejudices against another generation:
  • Intergenerational mobility is a measure of the changes in social status which occurs from the parents' to the children's generation.
  • An Inter-generational contract is a dependency between different generations based on the assumption that future generations, in honoring the contract, will provide a service to a generation that has previously done the same service to an older generation.
  • Intergenerational policies are public policies that incorporate an intergenerational approach to addressing an issue or have an impact across the generations.


While it is studied in societies in general the repercussions are also studied in terms of intergenerational family relationships

IssuesEdit

ConflictEdit

An intergenerational conflict is either a conflict situation between teenagers and adults or a more abstract conflict between two generations, which often involves all inclusive prejudices against another generation.

Intergenerational conflict also describes cultural, social, or economic discrepancies between generations, which may be caused by shifts in values or conflicts of interest between younger and older generations. An example are changes to an inter-generational contract that may be necessary to reflect a change in demographics. It is associated with the term "generation gap".

ContractEdit

Main article: Intergenerational accounting

An inter-generational contract is a dependency between different generations based on the assumption that future generations, in honoring the contract, will provide a service to a generation that has previously done the same service to an older generation.

The most common use of the term is in statutory pension insurance provisions and refers to the consensus to provide pension for the retired generations through payments made by the working generations.

The use of the word contract is not entirely accurate as the next generation implicitly enters the agreement without consent.

EquityEdit

Main article: Intergenerational equity

Intergenerational equity, in the sociological and psychological context, is the concept or idea of fairness or justice in relationships between children, youth, adults and seniors, particularly in terms of treatment and interactions. It has been studied in environmental and sociological settings.[1]

Conversations about intergenerational equity occur across several fields.[2] They include transition economics,[3] social policy, and government budget-making.[4] Intergenerational equity is also explored in environmental concerns,[5] including sustainable development,[6] global warming and climate change.

Conversations about intergenerational equity are also relevant to social justice arenas as well, where issues such as health care[7] are equal in importance to youth rights and youth voice are pressing and urgent. There is a strong interest within the legal community towards the application of intergenerational equity in law.[8]

Intergenerational policiesEdit

Main article: Intergenerational policies

An intergenerational policy is a public policy that incorporates an intergenerational approach to addressing an issue or has an impact across the generations. Approaching policy from an intergenerational perspective is based on an understanding of the interdependence and reciprocity that characterizes the relationship between the generations.

An intergenerational approach to public policy recognizes that generations share basic needs including adequate income, access to quality health care and social services, educational and employment opportunities, and a safe place to live. Further, policies that are supportive of any age group must build on the common concerns of all generations.[9]


See also Edit


References Edit

  1. Foot, D. & Venne, R. (2005) "Awakening to the Intergenerational Equity Debate in Canada." Journal of Canadian Studies.
  2. (n.d.) EPE Values: Intergenerational Ethics Earth and Peace Education Associates International website.
  3. (2005) "Economics of Intergenerational Equity in Transition Economies" 10–11 March 2005.
  4. Thompson, J. (2003) Research Paper no. 7 2002-03 Intergenerational Equity: Issues of Principle in the Allocation of Social Resources Between this Generation and the Next. Social Policy Group for the Parliament of Australia.
  5. Gosseries, A. (2008) “Theories of intergenerational justice: a synopsis”. S.A.P.I.EN.S. 1 (1)
  6. (2005) Understanding Sustainable Development Cambridge University Press.
  7. Williams, A. (1997) "Intergenerational equity: An exploration of the 'fair innings' argument." Health Economics. 6(2):117-32.
  8. O'Brein, M. (n.d.) Not, 'Is it Irreparable?' But, 'Is it Unnecessary?' Thoughts on a Practical Limit for Intergenerational Equity Suits. Eugene, OR: Constitutional Law Foundation.
  9. Generations United. (2010) "Guiding Principles"
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