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In medicine and epidemiology, the term morbidity can refer to

  • the state of being diseased (from Latin morbidus: sick, unhealthy),
  • the degree or severity of a disease,
  • the prevalence of a disease: the total number of cases in a particular population at a particular point in time,
  • the incidence of a disease: the number of new cases in a particular population during a particular time interval.

Accordingly, the term morbidity rate can refer either to the incidence rate or to the prevalence rate of a disease. Compare with mortality rate, the number of people dying from a particular disease during a given time interval, divided by the total number of people in the population. Morbidity is often what is measured by ICU scoring systems.

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • Gill B, Meltzer H, Hinds K and Petticrew M (1996) OPCS Surveys of Psychiatric Morbidity in Great Britain, Report 7: Psychiatric morbidity among homeless people, HMSO: London.
  • Green H, Maginnity A, Meltzer H, Goodman R and Ford T (2005) Mental health of children and young people in Great Britain, London: TSO. [1]
  • Kershaw A, Singleton N and Meltzer H (2000) Survey of the health and well-being of homeless people in Greater Glasgow: Summary Report London: National Statistics.
  • Forster K, Meltzer H, Gill B, Hinds K (1996) Adults with a Psychotic Disorder living in the Community: OPCS Surveys of Psychiatric Morbidity in Great Britain, Report 8. HMSO: London.
  • Lader D, Singleton N, and Meltzer H (2000) Psychiatric morbidity among young offenders in England and Wales, London: National Statistics.
  • Meltzer H, Lader D, Corbin T, Goodman R and Ford T (2004) The mental health of young people looked after by local authorities in England, London: TSO.

[2]. 15 McManus S, Meltzer H, Brugha T, Bebbington P and Jenkins R. (2009) Adult Psychiatric Morbidity in England, 2007: results of a household survey. London: The NHS Information Centre for health and social care. [www.ic.nhs.uk/pubs/psychiatricmorbidity07]

  • Meltzer H, Gill B, Petticrew M and Hinds K (1995) OPCS Surveys of Psychiatric Morbidity in Great Britain,Report 1: the prevalence of psychiatric morbidity among adults living in private households, HMSO:London.
  • Meltzer H, Gill B, Hinds K and Petticrew M (1996) OPCS Surveys of Psychiatric Morbidity in Great Britain, Report 4: The prevalence of psychiatric morbidity among adults living in institutions. HMSO: London.
  • Melzer D, Tom B, Brugha T, Fryers T, Grounds A, Johnson A, Meltzer H and Singleton N (2000) The Longitudinal study of psychiatric morbidity among prisoners in England andWales. Report to the Department of Health Policy Research Programme.
  • O’Brien M, Mortimer L, Singleton N and Meltzer H (2001) Psychiatric Morbidity among women prisoners in England andWales, London: TSO.
  • Singleton N, Bumpstead R, O’Brien M, Lee A, and Meltzer H (2001) Psychiatric morbidity among adultsliving in private households, 2000. HMSO: London

[3]

  • Singleton N, Lewis G. (2003) Better or worse: a longitudinal study of the mental health of adults in privatehouseholds in Great Britain. HMSO: London.

[4].

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