Wikia

Psychology Wiki

Lower motor neuron lesion

Talk0
34,141pages on
this wiki
Revision as of 13:06, February 19, 2010 by Dr Joe Kiff (Talk | contribs)

(diff) ← Older revision | Latest revision (diff) | Newer revision → (diff)

Assessment | Biopsychology | Comparative | Cognitive | Developmental | Language | Individual differences | Personality | Philosophy | Social |
Methods | Statistics | Clinical | Educational | Industrial | Professional items | World psychology |

Biological: Behavioural genetics · Evolutionary psychology · Neuroanatomy · Neurochemistry · Neuroendocrinology · Neuroscience · Psychoneuroimmunology · Physiological Psychology · Psychopharmacology (Index, Outline)


Spinal nerve.svg|
Lower motor neuron lesion
ICD-10
ICD-9
OMIM [1]
DiseasesDB 22143
MedlinePlus [2]
eMedicine /
MeSH {{{MeshNumber}}}

A lower motor neuron lesion is a lesion which affects nerve fibers traveling from the anterior horn of the spinal cord to the relevant muscle(s) -- the lower motor neuron.

One major characteristic used to identify a lower motor neuron lesion is flaccid paralysis - paralysis accompanied by muscle loss. This is in contrast to a upper motor neuron lesion, which often presents with spastic paralysis - paralysis accompanied by severe hypertonia.

Symptoms Edit

The extensor Babinski reflex is usually absent. Muscle paresis/paralysis, hypotonia/atonia, and hyporeflexia/areflexia are usually seen immediately following an insult. Muscle wasting, fasciculations and fibrillations are typically signs of end-stage muscle denervation and are seen over a longer time period. Another feature is the segmentation of symptoms - only muscles innervated by the damaged nerves will be symptomatic.

EtiologyEdit

Most common causes of lower motor neuron injuries are trauma to peripheral nerves that sever the axons and poliomyelitis - a virus that selectively attacks ventral horn cells. disuse atrophy of the muscle occurs i.e,shrinkage of muscle fibre finally replaced by fibrous tissu(fibrous musle)

Differential DiagnosisEdit

External linksEdit



This page uses Creative Commons Licensed content from Wikipedia (view authors).

Around Wikia's network

Random Wiki