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List of sequenced eukaryotic genomes

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File:S cerevisiae under DIC microscopy.jpg

This list of sequenced eukaryotic genomes contains all the eukaryotes known to have publicly available complete nuclear and organelle genome sequences that have been assembled, annotated and published; draft genomes are not included, nor are organelle-only sequences.

DNA was first sequenced in 1977. The first free-living organism to have its genome completely sequenced was the bacterium Haemophilus influenzae, in 1995. In 1996 Saccharomyces cerevisiae (baker's yeast) was the first eukaryote genome sequence to be released and in 1998 the first genome sequence for a multicellular eukaryote, Caenorhabditis elegans, was released.

ProtistsEdit

Following are the six earliest sequenced genomes of protists. For a more complete list, see the List of sequenced protist genomes.

Organism Type Relevance Genome size Number of genes predicted Organization Year of completion
Guillardia theta Cryptomonad Model organism 0.551 Mb
(nucleomorph genome only)
465,[1] 513, 598 (UniProt) Canadian Institute of Advanced Research, Philipps-University Marburg and the University of British Columbia 2001[1]
Plasmodium falciparum
Clone:3D7
Apicomplexan Human pathogen (malaria) 22.9 Mb 5,268[2] Malaria Genome Project Consortium 2002[2]
Plasmodium yoelii yoelii
Strain:17XNL
Apicomplexan Rodent pathogen (malaria) 23.1 Mb 5,878[3] TIGR and NMRC 2002[3]
Cryptosporidium hominis
Strain:TU502
Apicomplexan Human pathogen 10.4 Mb 3,994[4] Virginia Commonwealth University 2004[4]
Cryptosporidium parvum
C- or genotype 2 isolate
Apicomplexan Human pathogen 16.5 Mb 3,807[5] UCSF and University of Minnesota 2004[5]
Thalassiosira pseudonana
Strain:CCMP 1335
Diatom Model organism 34.5 Mb 11,242[6] Joint Genome Institute and the University of Washington 2004[6]


AnimalsEdit

Following are the five earliest sequenced genomes of animals. For a more complete list, see the List of sequenced animal genomes.

Organism Type Relevance Genome size Number of genes predicted Organization Year of completion
Caenorhabditis elegans
Strain:Bristol N2
Nematode Model animal 100 Mb 19,000[7] Washington University and the Sanger Institute 1998[7]
Drosophila melanogaster Fruit fly Model animal 165 Mb 13,600[8] Celera, UC Berkeley, Baylor College of Medicine, European DGP 2000[8]
Homo sapiens Human 3.2 Gb[9] 20,251 (UniProt) Human Genome Project Consortium and Celera Genomics Draft 2001[10][11]
Complete 2006[12]
Anopheles gambiae
Strain: PEST
Mosquito Vector of malaria 278 Mb 13,683[13] Celera Genomics and Genoscope 2002[13]
Takifugu rubripes Puffer fish Vertebrate with small genome 390 Mb 22–29,000[14] International Fugu Genome Consortium[15] 2002[16]

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. 1.0 1.1 Douglas S (April 2001). The highly reduced genome of an enslaved algal nucleus. Nature 410 (6832): 1091–6.
  2. 2.0 2.1 Gardner MJ (October 2002). Genome sequence of the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. Nature 419 (6906): 498–511.
  3. 3.0 3.1 Carlton JM (October 2002). Genome sequence and comparative analysis of the model rodent malaria parasite Plasmodium yoelii yoelii. Nature 419 (6906): 512–9.
  4. 4.0 4.1 Xu P (October 2004). The genome of Cryptosporidium hominis. Nature 431 (7012): 1107–12.
  5. 5.0 5.1 Abrahamsen MS (April 2004). Complete genome sequence of the apicomplexan, Cryptosporidium parvum. Science 304 (5669): 441–5.
  6. 6.0 6.1 Armbrust EV (October 2004). The genome of the diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana: ecology, evolution, and metabolism. Science 306 (5693): 79–86.
  7. 7.0 7.1 C. elegans Sequencing Consortium. (December 1998). Genome sequence of the nematode C. elegans: a platform for investigating biology. Science 282 (5396): 2012–8.
  8. 8.0 8.1 Adams MD (March 2000). The genome sequence of Drosophila melanogaster. Science 287 (5461): 2185–95.
  9. Human Genome Sequencing Consortium, International (October 2004). Finishing the euchromatic sequence of the human genome. Nature 431 (7011): 931–45.
  10. McPherson JD (February 2001). A physical map of the human genome. Nature 409 (6822): 934–41.
  11. Venter JC (February 2001). The sequence of the human genome. Science 291 (5507): 1304–51.
  12. Gregory SG (May 2006). The DNA sequence and biological annotation of human chromosome 1. Nature 441 (7091): 315–21.
  13. 13.0 13.1 Holt RA (October 2002). The genome sequence of the malaria mosquito Anopheles gambiae. Science 298 (5591): 129–49.H
  14. International Fugu Genome Consortium. Forth Genome Assembly
  15. International Fugu Genome Consortium
  16. Aparicio S (August 2002). Whole-genome shotgun assembly and analysis of the genome of Fugu rubripes. Science 297 (5585): 1301–10.

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