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Left-right confusion

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Left-right confusion is a cognitive impairment some people have in distinguishing the difference between the directions left and right. According to research by John R. Clarke (Drexel University) it affects about 15% of the population.[citation needed] These people can usually normally perform daily activities such as driving according to signs and navigating according to a map, but will often take a wrong turn when told to turn left or right and may have difficulties performing actions that require precise understanding of directional commands, such as ballroom dancing.[1][2][3][4]

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. Elving, Belle Which Is Right?. The Washington Post. URL accessed on 12 May 2010.
  2. Brandt, Jason, Mackavey, William (1981). Left-right confusion and the perception of bilateral symmetry. International Journal of Neuroscience 12 (2): 87–94.
  3. Hannay, H. Julia, P.J. Ciaccia, Joan W. Kerr, Darlene Barrett (1990). Self-report of right-left confusion in college men and women. Perceptual and Motor Skills 70 (2): 451–457.
  4. Harris, Lauren Julius, Gitterman, Steven R. (1978). University professors' self-descriptions of left-right confusability: sex and handedness differences. Perceptual and Motor Skills 47 (3 Pt 1): 819– 823.
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