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*[[Child sexuality#Middle_childhood|Latency in child sexuality]], a psychoanalytic phase, extending from roughly age seven to twelve, during which sexuality is repressed or sublimated (now more commonly called "middle childhood" and "prepubescence").
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'''Latency''' is a time delay between the moment something is initiated, and the moment one of its effects begins or becomes detectable. The word derives from the fact that during the period of latency the effects of an action are latent, meaning "potential" or "not yet observed". The word can have a number of associations in psychology.
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==In psychoanalysis==
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*[[Child sexuality#Middle_childhood|Latency in child sexuality]], a psychoanalytic phase, extending from roughly age seven to twelve, during which sexuality is repressed or sublimated (now more commonly called "middle childhood" and "prepubescence"). See also [[Freud's model of psychosexual development]]
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*[[Latent content]] of [[Contemporary dream interpretation|dreams]]
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==In illnesses==
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* [[Clinical latency]]
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* Latency, [[incubation period]]
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==In learning and memory==
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*[[Response latency]]
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==In physiological psychology==
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* the '''latency''' of a [[physiological]] response, that is, the delay between a [[stimulus]] and the response it triggers in an [[organism]], especially in the [[nervous system]] as measured by [[electrophysiological]] recordings
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==In social psychology==
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* [[Latency (political science)]]

Latest revision as of 08:17, March 16, 2010

Latency is a time delay between the moment something is initiated, and the moment one of its effects begins or becomes detectable. The word derives from the fact that during the period of latency the effects of an action are latent, meaning "potential" or "not yet observed". The word can have a number of associations in psychology.



In psychoanalysisEdit

In illnessesEdit

In learning and memoryEdit

In physiological psychologyEdit

In social psychologyEdit

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