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Labio-palatalization

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Labio-palatalized
◌ᶣ
Sound
[[File:Template:IPA audio filename| center| 150px]]


[create] Documentation
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Places of articulation
Labial
Bilabial
Labial-velar
Labial-alveolar
Labiodental
Bidental
Coronal
Linguolabial
Interdental
Dental
Alveolar
Apical
Laminal
Postalveolar
Alveolo-palatal
Retroflex
Dorsal
Palatal
Labial-palatal
Velar
Uvular
Uvular-epiglottal
Radical
Pharyngeal
Epiglotto-pharyngeal
Epiglottal
Glottal

A labio-palatalized sound is one that is simultaneously labialized and palatalized. Typically the roundedness is compressed, like [y], rather than protruded like [u]. The symbol in the International Phonetic Alphabet for this secondary articulation is ⟨ᶣ⟩, a superscript ⟨ɥ⟩, the symbol for the labio-palatal approximant. If such sounds pattern with other, labialized, consonants, they may instead be transcribed as palatalized consonants plus labialization, ⟨ʷ⟩, as with the [ɕʷ] = [ɕᶣ] of Abkhaz or the [ɲʷ] = [ɲᶣ] of Akan.

The labial-palatal approximant [ɥ] occurs in Mandarin Chinese and French, but is uncommon, as it is generally dependent upon the presence of front rounded vowels such as Template:IPAblink and Template:IPAblink, which are themselves not common.[1] However, the labial-palatal approximant and labio-palatalized consonants also appear in languages without front rounded vowels in the Caucasus and West Africa,[2] such as Abkhaz, and as allophones of labialized consonants before /i/, including the [tɕᶣ] at the beginning of the language name Twi. In Russian, /o/ and /u/ trigger labialization of any preceding consonant, including palatalized consonants, so that нёс 'he carried' is pronounced [nᶣos].

Labial–palatal consonantsEdit

Truly co-articulated labial–palatal consonants such as [c͡p, ɟ͡b, ɲ͡m] are theoretically possible.[3] However, the closest sounds attested from the world's languages are the labial–postalveolar consonants of Yélî Dnye in New Guinea, which are sometimes transcribed as labial–palatals.

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. Maddieson, Ian; Patterns of Sounds (Cambridge Studies in Speech Science and Communication); p. 95; ISBN 0521265363
  2. Maddieson, Ian; Patterns of Sounds; pp. 92 and 292
  3. Segmental phonology (see pp. 7–8)


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