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In [[philosophy]], '''knowledge relativity''' is the notion that [[knowledge]] can be seen as the relation between a form of ''[[knowledge representation|representation]]'' with up to two sorts of ''[[intent]]'' – [[communication]] and use goals – and with up to three ''subjects'' – one who knows, one who is informed, and one who observes and confirms.
 
In [[philosophy]], '''knowledge relativity''' is the notion that [[knowledge]] can be seen as the relation between a form of ''[[knowledge representation|representation]]'' with up to two sorts of ''[[intent]]'' – [[communication]] and use goals – and with up to three ''subjects'' – one who knows, one who is informed, and one who observes and confirms.
   
This relational and subject-oriented view of knowledge is an alternative to the [[objectivist]] truth-based view common in [[logic]].
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This relational and subject-oriented view of knowledge is an alternative to the [[objectivist]] truth-based view common in [[logic]].
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==See also==
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*[[Truth]]
   
 
== External link ==
 
== External link ==

Latest revision as of 19:49, April 13, 2010

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In philosophy, knowledge relativity is the notion that knowledge can be seen as the relation between a form of representation with up to two sorts of intentcommunication and use goals – and with up to three subjects – one who knows, one who is informed, and one who observes and confirms.

This relational and subject-oriented view of knowledge is an alternative to the objectivist truth-based view common in logic.

See alsoEdit

External link Edit


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