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Frederick Herzberg’s Two factor theory (also known as Motivator Hygiene Theory) attempts to explain job satisfaction and motivation in the workplace [1] This theory states that satisfaction and job dissatisfaction are driven by different factors – motivation and hygiene factors, respectively. Motivating factors are those aspects of the job that make people want to perform, and provide people with satisfaction, for example achievement in work, recognition, promotion opportunities. These motivating factors are considered to be intrinsic to the job, or the work carried out.[1] Hygiene factors include aspects of the working environment such as pay, company policies, supervisory practices, and other working conditions. [1]

While Hertzberg's model has stimulated much research, researchers have been unable to reliably empirically prove the model, with Hackman & Oldham suggesting that Hertzberg's original formulation of the model may have been a methodological artifact[1]. Furthermore, the theory does not consider individual differences, conversely predicting all employees will react in an identical manner to changes in motivating/hygiene factors. [1]. Finally, the model has been criticised in that it does not specify how motivating/hygiene factors are to be measured. [1]

ReferencesEdit

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 1.5 J. R. Hackman, G. R. Oldham (1976). Motivation through design of work. Organizational behaviour and human performance 16: 250-279.

{enWP|Two-factor theory}}

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