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(Created page with '{{CogPsy}} [[Image:Ishihara_9.png|right|thumb|240px|Example of an Ishihara color test plate. The numeral "74" should be clearly visible to viewers with normal color vision. Vie…')
 
 
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[[Image:Ishihara_9.png|right|thumb|240px|Example of an Ishihara color test plate. The numeral "74" should be clearly visible to viewers with normal color vision. Viewers with [[dichromat]] or anomalous [[trichromat]] may read it as "21", and viewers with [[achromat]] may see nothing.]]
 
[[Image:Ishihara_9.png|right|thumb|240px|Example of an Ishihara color test plate. The numeral "74" should be clearly visible to viewers with normal color vision. Viewers with [[dichromat]] or anomalous [[trichromat]] may read it as "21", and viewers with [[achromat]] may see nothing.]]
The '''Ishihara Color Test''' is a test for red-green [[color blindness|color deficiencies]]. It was named after its designer, Dr. [[Shinobu Ishihara]], a professor at the [[University of Tokyo]], who first published his tests in 1917. <ref name="ishihara1917">S. Ishihara, Tests for colour-blindness (Handaya, Tokyo, Hongo Harukicho, 1917).</ref>
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The '''Ishihara Color Test''' is a test for red-green [[color blindness|color deficiencies]]. It was named after its designer, Dr. [[Shinobu Ishihara]], a professor at the University of Tokyo, who first published his tests in 1917. <ref name="ishihara1917">S. Ishihara, Tests for colour-blindness (Handaya, Tokyo, Hongo Harukicho, 1917).</ref>
   
 
The test consists of a number of colored plates, called '''Ishihara plates''', each of which contain a circle of dots appearing randomized in color and size. Within the pattern are dots which form a number visible to those with normal color vision and invisible, or difficult to see, for those with a red-green color vision defect. The full test consists of 38 plates, but the existence of a deficiency is usually clear after a few plates. Testing the first 24 plates gives a more accurate diagnosis of the severity of the color vision defect.
 
The test consists of a number of colored plates, called '''Ishihara plates''', each of which contain a circle of dots appearing randomized in color and size. Within the pattern are dots which form a number visible to those with normal color vision and invisible, or difficult to see, for those with a red-green color vision defect. The full test consists of 38 plates, but the existence of a deficiency is usually clear after a few plates. Testing the first 24 plates gives a more accurate diagnosis of the severity of the color vision defect.

Latest revision as of 10:12, April 25, 2010

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File:Ishihara 9.png

The Ishihara Color Test is a test for red-green color deficiencies. It was named after its designer, Dr. Shinobu Ishihara, a professor at the University of Tokyo, who first published his tests in 1917. [1]

The test consists of a number of colored plates, called Ishihara plates, each of which contain a circle of dots appearing randomized in color and size. Within the pattern are dots which form a number visible to those with normal color vision and invisible, or difficult to see, for those with a red-green color vision defect. The full test consists of 38 plates, but the existence of a deficiency is usually clear after a few plates. Testing the first 24 plates gives a more accurate diagnosis of the severity of the color vision defect.

Common plates include a circle of dots in shades of green and light blues with a figure differentiated in shades of brown, or a circle of dots in shades of red, orange and yellow with a figure in shades of green; the first testing for protanopia and the second for deuteranopia.

File:Ishihara-12.gif

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ReferencesEdit

  1. S. Ishihara, Tests for colour-blindness (Handaya, Tokyo, Hongo Harukicho, 1917).

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