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The [[history of anatomy]] has been characterized, over time, by a continually developing understanding of the functions of [[organ (anatomy)|organ]]s and structures in the body. Methods have also advanced dramatically, advancing from examination of [[animal]]s through dissection of preserved cadavers (dead human bodies) to technologically complex techniques developed in the [[20th century]].
 
The [[history of anatomy]] has been characterized, over time, by a continually developing understanding of the functions of [[organ (anatomy)|organ]]s and structures in the body. Methods have also advanced dramatically, advancing from examination of [[animal]]s through dissection of preserved cadavers (dead human bodies) to technologically complex techniques developed in the [[20th century]].
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==Study==
 
==Study==
 
[[Image:Skeleton2.jpg|right|thumbnail|150px|A full articulated [[human skeleton]] used in education]]
 
[[Image:Skeleton2.jpg|right|thumbnail|150px|A full articulated [[human skeleton]] used in education]]

Latest revision as of 14:45, January 1, 2008

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File:Human skeleton diagram.png

Human anatomy is primarily the scientific study of the morphology of the adult human body.[1] It is subdivided into gross anatomy and microscopic anatomy.[1] Gross anatomy (also called topographical anatomy, regional anatomy, or anthropotomy) is the study of anatomical structures that can be seen by unaided vision.[1] Microscopic anatomy is the study of minute anatomical structures assisted with microscopes, which includes histology (the study of the organization of tissues),[1] and cytology (the study of cells).

In some of its facets human anatomy is closely related to embryology, comparative anatomy and comparative embryology,[1] through common roots in evolution; for example, much of the human body maintains the ancient segmental pattern that is present in all vertebrates with basic units being repeated, which is particularly obvious in the vertebral column and in the ribcage, and can be traced from very early embryos.

The human body consists of biological systems, that consist of organs, that consist of tissues, that consist of cells and connective tissue.

The history of anatomy has been characterized, over time, by a continually developing understanding of the functions of organs and structures in the body. Methods have also advanced dramatically, advancing from examination of animals through dissection of preserved cadavers (dead human bodies) to technologically complex techniques developed in the 20th century.

StudyEdit

Skeleton2

A full articulated human skeleton used in education

Generally, medical students, physiotherapists, nurses, paramedics, radiographers, artists, and students of certain biological sciences, learn gross anatomy and microscopic anatomy from anatomical models, skeletons, textbooks, diagrams, photographs, lectures and tutorials. The study of microscopic anatomy (or histology) can be aided by practical experience examining histological preparations (or slides) under a microscope; and in addition, medical students generally also learn gross anatomy with practical experience of dissection and inspection of cadavers (dead human bodies). A thorough working knowledge of anatomy is required by all medical doctors, especially surgeons, and doctors working in some diagnostic specialities, such as histopathology and radiology.

Human anatomy, physiology and biochemistry are complementary basic medical sciences, which are generally taught to medical students in their first year at medical school. Human anatomy can be taught regionally or systemically;[1] that is, respectively, studying anatomy by bodily regions such as the head and chest, or studying by specific systems, such as the nervous or respiratory systems. The major anatomy textbook, Gray's Anatomy, has recently been reorganized from a systems format to a regional format,[2][3] in line with modern teaching methods.

Regional groupsEdit

Major organ systemsEdit

Superficial anatomyEdit

File:Basic human anatomy labeled.jpg

Superficial anatomy or surface anatomy is important in human anatomy being the study of anatomical landmarks that can be readily identified from the contours or other reference points on the surface of the body.[1] With knowledge of superficial anatomy, physicians gauge the position and anatomy of the associated deeper structures.

Common names of well known parts of the human body, from top to bottom:

Internal organsEdit

Common names of internal organs (in alphabetical order) :

Adrenals — Appendix — Bladder — Brain — Eyes — Gall bladder — Heart — Intestines — Kidney — Liver — Lungs — Esophagus — Ovaries — Pancreas — Parathyroids — Pituitary — Prostate — Spleen — Stomach — Testicles — Thymus — Thyroid — Veins — Uterus

BrainEdit

Main article: Human brain

Amygdala — Brain stem — Cerebellum — Cerebral cortex — Limbic system — medulla — midbrain — pons

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

External links Edit

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