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'''Harry Gordon Frankfurt''' (born May 29, 1929) is a [[professor]] emeritus of [[philosophy]] at [[Princeton University]]. He previously taught at [[Yale]] University and [[Rockefeller University]]. He obtained his [[Ph.D.]] in [[1954]] at [[Johns Hopkins University]]. His major areas of interest include [[moral philosophy]], [[philosophy of mind]] and [[philosophy of action|action]], and [[17th century]] [[rationalism]]. He recently republished his 1986 paper ''[[On Bullshit]]'', a philosophical look at "[[bullshit#Bullshit in philosophy|bullshit]]" and how it is both used and understood today. He appeared on [[Jon Stewart]]'s [[The Daily Show]] on [[March 14]] [[2005]] to publicize his latest book.
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'''Harry Gordon Frankfurt''' (born May 29, 1929) is a [[professor]] emeritus of [[philosophy]] at [[Princeton University]]. He previously taught at [[Yale]] University and [[Rockefeller University]]. He obtained his Ph.D. in [[1954]] at [[Johns Hopkins University]]. His major areas of interest include [[moral philosophy]], [[philosophy of mind]] and [[philosophy of action|action]], and 17th century [[rationalism]]. He recently republished his 1986 paper ''[[On Bullshit]]'', a philosophical look at "[[bullshit#Bullshit in philosophy|bullshit]]" and how it is both used and understood today.
   
 
Among philosophers Frankfurt is best known for his interpretation of Descartes's rationalism, for his account of freedom of the will based on his concept of [[higher-order volitions]], and for developing what are known as "Frankfurt counterexamples", thought experiments in the philosophy of action designed to show the possibility of situations in which a person could not have done other than she did but in which, our intuition is to say that, she nonetheless chose freely.
 
Among philosophers Frankfurt is best known for his interpretation of Descartes's rationalism, for his account of freedom of the will based on his concept of [[higher-order volitions]], and for developing what are known as "Frankfurt counterexamples", thought experiments in the philosophy of action designed to show the possibility of situations in which a person could not have done other than she did but in which, our intuition is to say that, she nonetheless chose freely.

Latest revision as of 17:56, August 27, 2006

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Harry Gordon Frankfurt
Professor Frankfurt
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Born
May 29, 1929
Died}}

Harry Gordon Frankfurt (born May 29, 1929) is a professor emeritus of philosophy at Princeton University. He previously taught at Yale University and Rockefeller University. He obtained his Ph.D. in 1954 at Johns Hopkins University. His major areas of interest include moral philosophy, philosophy of mind and action, and 17th century rationalism. He recently republished his 1986 paper On Bullshit, a philosophical look at "bullshit" and how it is both used and understood today.

Among philosophers Frankfurt is best known for his interpretation of Descartes's rationalism, for his account of freedom of the will based on his concept of higher-order volitions, and for developing what are known as "Frankfurt counterexamples", thought experiments in the philosophy of action designed to show the possibility of situations in which a person could not have done other than she did but in which, our intuition is to say that, she nonetheless chose freely.

Bibliography Edit

  • Frankfurt, Harry (2005). On Bullshit, Princeton University Press. ISBN 0691122946.
  • The Reasons of Love. Princeton University Press (2004)
  • Necessity, Volition, and Love. Cambridge University Press (1999)
  • The Importance of What We Care about. Philosophical Essays. Cambridge University Press (1988)
  • Demons, Dreamers, and Madmen. Bobbs-Merrill (1970)
  • "Freedom of the Will and the Concept of the Person" (1971) Journal of Philophy
  • Taking Ourselves Seriously and Getting it Right. Stanford University Press (2006)

External links Edit

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