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Genetics of human taste perception

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Phenylthiocarbamide Edit

There are three SNPs (single nucleotide polymorphisms) along the gene that may render its proteins unresponsive.[1] There is conflicting evidence as to whether the inheritance of this trait is dominant or incomplete dominant.[citation needed] Any person with a single functional copy of this gene can make the protein and is sensitive to PTC.[citation needed] Some studies have shown that homozygous tasters experience a more intense bitterness than people that are heterozygous; other studies have indicated that another gene may determine taste sensitivity.[citation needed]

The frequency of PTC taster and non-taster alleles vary in different human populations.[2]


Workers in this areaEdit

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. Kim UK, Jorgenson E, Coon H, Leppert M, Risch N, Drayna D (2003). Positional cloning of the human quantitative trait locus underlying taste sensitivity to phenylthiocarbamide. Science 299 (5610): 1221–1225.
  2. (2012). Genetic study of phenylthiocarbamide (PTC) taste perception among six human populations of Jammu and Kashmir (India). Egypt J Med Hum Genet 13 (2).

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