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Genetics of animal taste perception

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MammalsEdit

CatsEdit

Cats have relatively few taste buds compared to humans. Domestic and wild cats share a gene mutation that keeps their sweet taste buds from binding to sugary molecules like carbohydrates, leaving them with no ability to taste sweetness.[1] Their taste buds instead respond to amino acids, bitter tastes and acids.[2]

Sperm whaleEdit

The sperm whale's cerebrum is the largest in all mammalia, both in absolute and relative terms. The olfactory system is reduced, suggesting that the sperm whale has a poor sense of taste and smell. By contrast, the auditory system is enlarged. The pyramidal tract is poorly developed, reflecting the reduction of its limbs.[3]

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. Why Cats Can’t Taste Sweets. Petside. URL accessed on 2013-01-11.
  2. Bradshaw, John W. S. (1 July 2006). The Evolutionary Basis for the Feeding Behavior of Domestic Dogs (Canis familiaris) and Cats (Felis catus). Journal of Nutrition 136 (7): 1927S–1931.
  3. (1998). Ontogenesis of the sperm whale brain. The Journal of Comparative Neurology 399 (2): 210–28.

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