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(New page: {{AssessPsy}} The General Health Questionnaire (GHQ) is a widely used questionnaire to assess general well-being and distress. Several versions of different length are available. In ep...)
 
 
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In clinical studies, the 28-items "scaled" version (it has four subscales: somatisation, social dysfunction, anxiety, depression) or the 30-items versions are most frequently used. GHQ that was developed by the psychiatrist Sir [[David Goldberg]] in Manchester, UK (later London, UK) has been translated to all major languages.
 
In clinical studies, the 28-items "scaled" version (it has four subscales: somatisation, social dysfunction, anxiety, depression) or the 30-items versions are most frequently used. GHQ that was developed by the psychiatrist Sir [[David Goldberg]] in Manchester, UK (later London, UK) has been translated to all major languages.
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It is sometimes used in [[health]] settings as a [[screening test]] and as an aid in [[diagnosis]].
   
   
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[[Category:Global mental health asssessment]]
 
[[Category:Global mental health asssessment]]
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[[Category:Personality measures]]
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[[Category:Questionairres]]

Latest revision as of 22:41, May 8, 2009

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The General Health Questionnaire (GHQ) is a widely used questionnaire to assess general well-being and distress. Several versions of different length are available. In epidemiological studies a 12-items version is mostly used.

In clinical studies, the 28-items "scaled" version (it has four subscales: somatisation, social dysfunction, anxiety, depression) or the 30-items versions are most frequently used. GHQ that was developed by the psychiatrist Sir David Goldberg in Manchester, UK (later London, UK) has been translated to all major languages.

It is sometimes used in health settings as a screening test and as an aid in diagnosis.


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