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The '''Freudian slip''' is named after [[Sigmund Freud]], who described the phenomenon he called '''faulty action''' ('''''Fehlleistung''''' or '''''parapraxis''''') in his [[1901]] book ''The Psychopathology of Everyday Life''.
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{{Psychoanalysis}}
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A '''Freudian slip''', also called '''parapraxis''', is an error in [[speech communication|speech]], [[memory]], or physical action that is interpreted as occurring due to the interference of some [[unconscious mind|unconscious]] ("dynamically repressed"), subdued wish, conflict, or train of thought. The concept is thus part of classical [[psychoanalysis]].
   
The ''Freudian slip'' is an error in human action, speech or memory that is believed to be caused by the [[subconscious]] mind. The error often appears to the observer as being casual, bizarre or nonsensical, but has some deeper significance. For example, a skeptic might say: "Excuse me, but I'm having doubts about your theories, Dr. Fraud."
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Slips of the tongue and the pen are the classical parapraxes, but psychoanalytic theory also embraces such [[phenomena]] as misreadings, mishearings, temporary forgettings, and the mislaying and losing of objects.
   
Involuntary mistake made while writing or speaking. According to Freud in his early [[psychoanalytic theory]] it represents a missed deed that hides a [[subconscious desire]].
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==History==
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The Freudian slip is named after [[Sigmund Freud]], who in his 1901 book ''[[The Psychopathology of Everyday Life]]'', described and analyzed a large number of seemingly trivial, bizarre, or nonsensical errors and slips.
   
Also known as '''lapus''' in the literature there are a number of different lapsus depending on the mode of communication:
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Freud never named an idea, discovery, or concept after himself, instead calling his therapies psychoanalysis. (Today, after countless revisions by those in the field, it is now called [[psychodynamic]].) It is unknown who first coined the term "Freudian slip" and since has been used around the world in various pop-culture referencing and everyday living.
* '''''Lapsus Linguae''''' (pl. same): slip of the tongue.
 
* '''''Lapsus Calami''''': slip of the pen. With the variation of '''''Lapsus Clavis''''': slip of the typewriting
 
* '''''Lapsus Memoriae''''': slip of memory.
 
   
Popularization of the term has diluted its technical meaning in some contexts to include any slip-of-the-tongue phenomenon, often in an attempt by the user to humorously assign hidden motives or sexual innuendo to the mistake or blooper. This is particularly common with names, as when a speaker calls a listener by the wrong name. Thus, in everyday usage, ''Freudian slip'' has come to mean a slip-of-the-tongue that reveals the speaker's true meaning or intention.
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The process of analysis is often quite lengthy and complex, as was the case with many of the dreams in his book ''[[The Interpretation of Dreams]]'' (1899). An obstacle that faces the non-German reader is that Freud's emphasis on 'slips of the tongue' leads to the inclusion of a great deal of material that is extremely resistant to translation.
   
Although not all human errors can be technically attributed to Freudian slips, such behavior is often analyzed as if they were. "Sometimes the truth has a way of coming out in the most embarrassing and unexpected ways." This may be true in many cases, but such analysis should be treated with skepticism.
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As in the study of dreams, Freud submits his discussion with the intention of demonstrating the existence of unconscious mental processes in the healthy:
   
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{{cquote|In the same way that psycho-analysis makes use of dream interpretation, it also profits by the study of the numerous little slips and mistakes which people make -- symptomatic actions, as they are called [...] I have pointed out that these phenomena are not accidental, that they require more than physiological explanations, that they have a meaning and can be interpreted, and that one is justified in inferring from them the presence of restrained or repressed intentions and intentions. [Freud, ''An Autobiographical Study'' (1925)]}}
   
==See also==
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Freud, himself, referred to these slips as '''''Fehlleistungen''''' (meaning "faulty actions", "faulty functions" or "misperformances" in [[German language|German]]); the Greek term '''''parapraxes''''' (plural of "parapraxis", from the Greek παρά [''para''] and πρᾶξις [''praxis''], meaning "another action" in English) was the creation of his English translator, as is the form "symptomatic action".
   
==References & Bibliography==
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==Popularity==
==Key texts==
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Popularisation of the term has resulted in its being applied to any slip-of-the-tongue phenomenon, often in an attempt by the user to humorously assign hidden motives or an air of sexual innuendo to the mistake. This has brought about a dilution of the original technical meaning, with the word "Freudian" being applied to interpretations and explanations that have no essential connection with genuine psychoanalytic thought.
===Books===
 
   
===Papers===
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==Alternative explanations of "slips of the tongue"==
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{{Main|Speech error}}
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In contrast to psychoanalytic theorists, cognitive psychologists claim that linguistic slips can represent a sequencing conflict in grammar production. From this perspective, slips may be due to cognitive underspecification that can take a variety of forms – inattention, incomplete sense data or insufficient knowledge. Secondly, they may be due to the existence of some locally appropriate response pattern that is strongly primed by its prior usage, recent activation or emotional change or by the situation calling conditions.<ref name="abc">"Language and Communication" B. MacMahon 1995 P. 15, 4, 289-328</ref>
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Some sentences are just susceptible to the process of banalisation: the replacement of archaic or unusual expressions with forms that are in more common use. In other words, the errors were due to strong habit substitution.<ref name="abc"/>
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In general use, the term 'Freudian slip' has been debased to refer to any accidental [[slips of the tongue]].<ref name="oed"/> Thus many examples are found in explanations and dictionaries which do not strictly fit the psychoanalytic definition.
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For example: She: 'What would you like—bread and butter, or cake?' He: 'Bed and butter.'<ref name="oed">"FREUDIAN SLIP" Concise Oxford Companion to the English Language. Ed. Tom McArthur. Oxford University Press, 1998. Oxford Reference Online. Oxford University Press. University of New South Wales. 16 July 2010 <http://www.oxfordreference.com/views/ENTRY.html?subview=Main&entry=t29.e492></ref>
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In the above, the man may be presumed to have a sexual feeling or intention that he wished to leave unexpressed, ''not'' a sexual feeling or intention that was dynamically repressed. His sexual intention was therefore ''secret'', rather than ''unconscious'', and any 'parapraxis' would inhere in the idea that he ''unconsciously wished to express that intention'', rather than in the sexual connotation of the substitution.
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==See also==
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* [[Action slips]]
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* [[Cognition]]
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* [[Lapsus]]
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* [[Pun]]
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* [[Spoonerism]]
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* [[Malapropism]]
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* [[Tip of the tongue]]
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* [[Signorelli parapraxis]]
   
==Additional material==
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==References==
===Books===
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{{Reflist}}
   
===Papers===
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* Bloom, J. (2007, October). Lecture. Presented at New School University, New York, New York.
*[http://scholar.google.com/scholar?sourceid=mozclient&num=50&scoring=d&ie=utf-8&oe=utf-8&q=Freudian slip Google Scholar]
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* Baars ''et al.'' (1992). Some caveats on testing the Freudian Slip Hypothesis, ''Experimental Slips and Human Error: Exploring the Architecture of Volition.''
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* Freud, Sigmund. (1991 [1915]) Introductory Lectures on Psychoanalysis. Penguin Books Ltd; New Ed edition, pp50–108
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* Jacoby L.L., & Kelley, C.M. (1992). A process-dissociation framework for investigating unconscious influences: Freudian slips, projective tests, subliminal perception and signal detection theory. ''Current Directions in Psychological Science'', 1, 174–179.
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* Motley, M.T. (1985). Slips of the tongue. ''Scientific American'', 253, 116-127
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* Smith, D.J. ''Speech Errors, Speech Production Models, and Speech Pathology'', (2003), Online. Internet. http://www.smithsrisca.demon.co.uk/speech-errors.html
   
 
==External links==
 
==External links==
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* [http://kaltric.de/mat/matphil/freudpsychopatho Der Mensch determiniert durch unbewusste Motivierung. Erläutert in der Psychopathologie des Alltags von S. Freud. Erläuterte kritische Zusammenfassung der Psychopathologie mit Erläuterung Freud’scher Versprecher (German)]
   
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{{DEFAULTSORT:Freudian Slip}}
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[[Category:English idioms]]
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[[Category:Error]]
 
[[Category:Freudian psychology]]
 
[[Category:Freudian psychology]]
[[category:Recall]
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[[Category:Popular psychology]]
   
:de:Freudscher Versprecher
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<!--
:he:טעות פרוידיאנית
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[[bg:Неволна грешка]]
:it:Lapsus freudiano
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[[de:Freudscher Versprecher]]
:nl:Freudiaanse verspreking
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[[es:Acto fallido]]
:pl:Freudowska pomyłka
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[[fr:Acte manqué]]
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[[he:טעות פרוידיאנית]]
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[[nl:Freudiaanse verspreking]]
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[[pl:Czynność pomyłkowa]]
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[[pt:Ato falho]]
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[[ro:Act ratat]]
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[[ru:Оговорка по Фрейду]]
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[[sr:Омашке]]
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[[fi:Freudilainen lipsahdus]]
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[[sv:Freudiansk felsägning]]
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[[zh:弗洛伊德式错误]]
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-->
 
{{enWP|Freudian slip}}
 
{{enWP|Freudian slip}}

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A Freudian slip, also called parapraxis, is an error in speech, memory, or physical action that is interpreted as occurring due to the interference of some unconscious ("dynamically repressed"), subdued wish, conflict, or train of thought. The concept is thus part of classical psychoanalysis.

Slips of the tongue and the pen are the classical parapraxes, but psychoanalytic theory also embraces such phenomena as misreadings, mishearings, temporary forgettings, and the mislaying and losing of objects.

History

The Freudian slip is named after Sigmund Freud, who in his 1901 book The Psychopathology of Everyday Life, described and analyzed a large number of seemingly trivial, bizarre, or nonsensical errors and slips.

Freud never named an idea, discovery, or concept after himself, instead calling his therapies psychoanalysis. (Today, after countless revisions by those in the field, it is now called psychodynamic.) It is unknown who first coined the term "Freudian slip" and since has been used around the world in various pop-culture referencing and everyday living.

The process of analysis is often quite lengthy and complex, as was the case with many of the dreams in his book The Interpretation of Dreams (1899). An obstacle that faces the non-German reader is that Freud's emphasis on 'slips of the tongue' leads to the inclusion of a great deal of material that is extremely resistant to translation.

As in the study of dreams, Freud submits his discussion with the intention of demonstrating the existence of unconscious mental processes in the healthy:

In the same way that psycho-analysis makes use of dream interpretation, it also profits by the study of the numerous little slips and mistakes which people make -- symptomatic actions, as they are called [...] I have pointed out that these phenomena are not accidental, that they require more than physiological explanations, that they have a meaning and can be interpreted, and that one is justified in inferring from them the presence of restrained or repressed intentions and intentions. [Freud, An Autobiographical Study (1925)]

Freud, himself, referred to these slips as Fehlleistungen (meaning "faulty actions", "faulty functions" or "misperformances" in German); the Greek term parapraxes (plural of "parapraxis", from the Greek παρά [para] and πρᾶξις [praxis], meaning "another action" in English) was the creation of his English translator, as is the form "symptomatic action".

Popularity

Popularisation of the term has resulted in its being applied to any slip-of-the-tongue phenomenon, often in an attempt by the user to humorously assign hidden motives or an air of sexual innuendo to the mistake. This has brought about a dilution of the original technical meaning, with the word "Freudian" being applied to interpretations and explanations that have no essential connection with genuine psychoanalytic thought.

Alternative explanations of "slips of the tongue"

Main article: Speech error

In contrast to psychoanalytic theorists, cognitive psychologists claim that linguistic slips can represent a sequencing conflict in grammar production. From this perspective, slips may be due to cognitive underspecification that can take a variety of forms – inattention, incomplete sense data or insufficient knowledge. Secondly, they may be due to the existence of some locally appropriate response pattern that is strongly primed by its prior usage, recent activation or emotional change or by the situation calling conditions.[1]

Some sentences are just susceptible to the process of banalisation: the replacement of archaic or unusual expressions with forms that are in more common use. In other words, the errors were due to strong habit substitution.[1]

In general use, the term 'Freudian slip' has been debased to refer to any accidental slips of the tongue.[2] Thus many examples are found in explanations and dictionaries which do not strictly fit the psychoanalytic definition.

For example: She: 'What would you like—bread and butter, or cake?' He: 'Bed and butter.'[2]

In the above, the man may be presumed to have a sexual feeling or intention that he wished to leave unexpressed, not a sexual feeling or intention that was dynamically repressed. His sexual intention was therefore secret, rather than unconscious, and any 'parapraxis' would inhere in the idea that he unconsciously wished to express that intention, rather than in the sexual connotation of the substitution.

See also

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 "Language and Communication" B. MacMahon 1995 P. 15, 4, 289-328
  2. 2.0 2.1 "FREUDIAN SLIP" Concise Oxford Companion to the English Language. Ed. Tom McArthur. Oxford University Press, 1998. Oxford Reference Online. Oxford University Press. University of New South Wales. 16 July 2010 <http://www.oxfordreference.com/views/ENTRY.html?subview=Main&entry=t29.e492>
  • Bloom, J. (2007, October). Lecture. Presented at New School University, New York, New York.
  • Baars et al. (1992). Some caveats on testing the Freudian Slip Hypothesis, Experimental Slips and Human Error: Exploring the Architecture of Volition.
  • Freud, Sigmund. (1991 [1915]) Introductory Lectures on Psychoanalysis. Penguin Books Ltd; New Ed edition, pp50–108
  • Jacoby L.L., & Kelley, C.M. (1992). A process-dissociation framework for investigating unconscious influences: Freudian slips, projective tests, subliminal perception and signal detection theory. Current Directions in Psychological Science, 1, 174–179.
  • Motley, M.T. (1985). Slips of the tongue. Scientific American, 253, 116-127
  • Smith, D.J. Speech Errors, Speech Production Models, and Speech Pathology, (2003), Online. Internet. http://www.smithsrisca.demon.co.uk/speech-errors.html

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