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Fanaticism is an emotion of being filled with excessive, uncritical zeal, particularly for an extreme religious or political cause, or with an obsessive enthusiasm for a pastime or hobby.

According to philosopher George Santayana, "Fanaticism consists in redoubling your effort when you have forgotten your aim"; according to Winston Churchill, "A fanatic is one who can't change his mind and won't change the subject".

The difference between a fan and a fanatic is that while both have an overwhelming liking or interest in a given subject, behaviour of a fanatic will be viewed as violating prevailing social norms, while that of a fan will not violate those norms (although is usually considered unusual).

A fanatic differs from a crank in that the latter term is typically associated with a position or opinion which is so far from the norm as to appear ludicrous and/or provably wrong, while the subject of the fanatic's obsession may well be "normal", with only the scale of involvement being abnormally disproportionate.

Categories of fanaticism Edit

  • consumer fanaticism - the level of involvement or interest one has in the liking of a particular person, group, trend, artwork or idea.
  • religious fanaticism - considered by some to be the most extreme form of religious fundamentalism.
  • anti-religious fanaticism: As opposed to religious fanaticism, anti-religious fanaticism deals with the fanatic opposition to religious doctrine. An example of it would be Anti-clericalism.

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • Scott Thorne, Gordon C. Bruner, Qualitative Market Research: An International Journal, 2006, Volume: 9, Issue: 1, online
  • (Life of Reason, 1905, vol. 1, Introduction)
  • (Thorne&Bruner 2006)


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