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Distress thermometer

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The Distress Thermometer is a simple checklist assessment technique used in cancer care and other area of physical health. It is a rapid-screening measure with a 0–10 visual analogue scale, in the form of a thermometer labeled with "No Distress" at 0, "Moderate Distress" at the midpoint, and "Extreme Distress" at 10. The person can indicate their level of distress on the scale. Supplementary questions covering various areas of distress (eg family problems, physical problemscan then be covered. The tool swwas developed by the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) in the US.



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References & BibliographyEdit

Key textsEdit

BooksEdit

  • Heaven C, Maguire P. (2003) Communication issues. In Lloyd-Williams M. (Ed.) Psychosocial Issues in Palliative Care. Oxford: Oxford University Press

PapersEdit

  • Cull A, Stewart M, Altman DG. (1995) Assessment of and intervention for psychosocial problems in routine oncology practice. British Journal of Cancer. 72, 229-235
  • Parle M, Jones B, Maguire P. (1996) Maladaptive coping and affective disorders among cancer patients. Psychological Medicine 26, 735-744
  • Ward SE, Goldberg N, Miller-McCauley V, Mueller C, Nolan A. Pawlik-Plank D, Robbins A, Stormoen D, Weissman DE. (1993) Patient-related barriers to management of cancer pain. Pain, 52, 319-324
  • Heaven CM, Maguire P. (1997) Disclosure of concerns by hospice patients and their identification by nurses. Palliative Medicine, 11, 283-290
  • Detmar SB, Aaronson NE, Wever LD V, Muller M, Schornagel JH. (2000) How are you feeling? Who wants to know? Patients' and oncologists' preferences for discussing healthrelated quality of life issues. Journal of Clinical Oncology, 18, 3295-3301
  • Sollner W, DeVries A, Steixner E, Lukas P. Sprinzi G, Rumpold G, Maislinger S. (2001) How successful are oncologists in identifying patient distress, perceived social support, and need for psychosocial counselling? British Journal of Cancer, 84, 179-185
  • Passik S, Dugan W, McDonald MV, Rosenfeld B, Theobald DE, Edgerton S. (1998) Oncologists' recognition of depression in their patients with cancer. Journal of Clinical Oncology, 16,1594-1600
  • Detmar SB, Aaronson NK, Wever LDV, Muller M, Schornagel JH. (2000) How are you feeling? Who wants to know? Patients' and oncologists' preferences for discussing healthrelated quality of life issues. Journal of Clinical Oncology, 18, 3295-3301

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