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Distraction is the diverting of the attention of an individual or group from the chosen object of attention onto the source of distraction. Distraction is caused by one of the following: lack of ability to pay attention; lack of interest in the object of attention; greater interest in something other than the object of attention; or the great intensity, novelness or attractiveness of the source of distraction.

Distractions come from both external sources (physical stimulus through the five senses) or internal sources (thought, emotion, daydreams, sex drive, etc.)

Divided attention is also defined as distraction in situations requiring full attention on a single object (sports, academic tests, performance, etc.) A handful of interruptions may or may not be considered distractions, because their value or importance is greater than the object of attention; such as a welcomed phone call, creative inspiration, or a medical emergency. Distraction is a major cause of procrastination.

Distraction research

  • Research was conducted regarding specific areas of advertisements which tested subjects viewed, and how much time those subjects spend looking at said areas.
  • Dr. Roy Baumeister, a sociologist, once tested subjects' willpower against various distractions and temptations.

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External links


Attention
Aspects of attention
Absent-mindedness | Attentional control | Attention span | Attentional shift | Attention management | Attentional blink | Attentional bias | Attention economy | Attention and emotion | Attention optimization | Change blindness | Concentration |Dichotic listening | Directed attention fatigue | Distraction | Distractibility | Divided attention | Hyperfocus | Inattentional blindness | Mindfulness |Mind-wandering | Meditation | Salience | Selective attention | Selective inattention | Signal detection theory | Sustained attention | Vigilance | Visual search |
Developmental aspects of attention
centration | [[]] |
Neuroanatomy of attention
Attention versus memory in prefrontal cortex | Default mode network | Dorsal attention network | Medial geniculate nucleus | | Neural mechanisms | Ventral attention network | Intraparietal sulcus |
Neurochemistry of attention
Glutamatergic system  | [[]] |
Attention in clinical settings
ADHD | ADHD contoversy | ADD | AADD | Attention and aging | Attention restoration theory | Attention seeking | Attention training | Centering | Distractability | Hypervigilance | Hyperprosexia | Cognitive-shifting | Mindfulness-based Cognitive Therapy |
Attention in educational settings
Concentration |
Assessing attention
Benton | Continuous Performance Task | TOMM | Wechsler Memory Scale |
Treating attention problems
CBT | Psychotherapy |
Prominant workers in attention
Baddeley | Broadbent | [[]] | Treisman | Cave |
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