Wikia

Psychology Wiki

Decerebrate posturing

Talk0
34,135pages on
this wiki
Revision as of 00:19, September 12, 2012 by Dr Joe Kiff (Talk | contribs)

Assessment | Biopsychology | Comparative | Cognitive | Developmental | Language | Individual differences | Personality | Philosophy | Social |
Methods | Statistics | Clinical | Educational | Industrial | Professional items | World psychology |

Clinical: Approaches · Group therapy · Techniques · Types of problem · Areas of specialism · Taxonomies · Therapeutic issues · Modes of delivery · Model translation project · Personal experiences ·


File:Decerebrate.jpg

Decerebrate posturing is also called decerebrate response, decerebrate rigidity, or extensor posturing. It describes the involuntary extension of the upper extremities in response to external stimuli. In decerebrate posturing, the head is arched back, the arms are extended by the sides, and the legs are extended.[1] A hallmark of decerebrate posturing is extended elbows.[2] The arms and legs are extended and rotated internally.[3] The patient is rigid, with the teeth clenched.[3] The signs can be on just one or the other side of the body or on both sides, and it may be just in the arms and may be intermittent.[3]

A person displaying decerebrate posturing in response to pain gets a score of two in the motor section of the Glasgow Coma Scale (for adults) and the Pediatric Glasgow Coma Scale (for infants).

Decerebrate posturing indicates brain stem damage, specifically damage below the level of the red nucleus (e.g. mid-collicular lesion). It is exhibited by people with lesions or compression in the midbrain and lesions in the cerebellum.[2] Decerebrate posturing is commonly seen in Pontine strokes. A patient with decorticate posturing may begin to show decerebrate posturing, or may go from one form of posturing to the other.[4] Progression from decorticate posturing to decerebrate posturing is often indicative of uncal (transtentorial) or tonsilar brain herniation. Activation of gamma motor neurons is thought to be important in decerebrate rigidity due to studies in animals showing that dorsal root transection eliminates decerebrate rigidity symptoms.[5]

In competitive contact sports, posturing (typically of the forearms) can occur with an impact to the head and is termed the fencing response. In this case, the temporary posturing display indicates transient disruption of brain neurochemicals, which wanes within seconds.

See also

References

  1. Cite error: Invalid <ref> tag; no text was provided for refs named adam
  2. Cite error: Invalid <ref> tag; no text was provided for refs named Cuccurullo04
  3. 3.0 3.1 3.2 Silverberg, Mark; Greenberg, Michael R.; Hendrickson, Robert A. (2005). Greenberg's Text-Atlas of Emergency Medicine, 53, Hagerstwon, MD: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.
  4. Cite error: Invalid <ref> tag; no text was provided for refs named AllRefer.com
  5. Berne and Levy principles of physiology/[editors] Metthew N. Levy, Bruce M. Koeppen, Bruce A. Stanton.-4th ed.Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Mosby, 2006.
This page uses Creative Commons Licensed content from Wikipedia (view authors).

Around Wikia's network

Random Wiki