Wikia

Psychology Wiki

Comfort

Talk0
34,142pages on
this wiki

Assessment | Biopsychology | Comparative | Cognitive | Developmental | Language | Individual differences | Personality | Philosophy | Social |
Methods | Statistics | Clinical | Educational | Industrial | Professional items | World psychology |

Cognitive Psychology: Attention · Decision making · Learning · Judgement · Memory · Motivation · Perception · Reasoning · Thinking  - Cognitive processes Cognition - Outline Index


This article is in need of attention from a psychologist/academic expert on the subject.
Please help recruit one, or improve this page yourself if you are qualified.
This banner appears on articles that are weak and whose contents should be approached with academic caution
.

Comfort (or comfortability, or being comfortable) is a sense of physical or psychological ease, often characterized as a lack of hardship. Persons who are lacking in comfort are uncomfortable, or experiencing discomfort.

Psychological comfortEdit

A degree of psychological comfort can be achieved by recreating experiences that are associated with pleasant memories, such as engaging in familiar activities,[1] maintaining the presence of familiar objects,[1] and consumption of comfort foods.

Physical comfortEdit

Physical comfort is a particular concern in health care, as providing comfort to the sick and injured is one goal of healthcare, and can facilitate recovery.[2] Persons who are surrounded with things that provide psychological comfort may be described as being within their comfort zone.

Because of the personal nature of positive associations, psychological comfort is highly subjective.[2]

The use of "comfort" as a verb generally implies that the subject is in a state of pain, suffering or affliction. Where the term is used to describe the support given to someone who has experienced a tragedy, the word is synonymous with consolation or solace. However, comfort is used much more broadly, as one can provide physical comfort to someone who is not in a position to be uncomfortable. For example, a person might sit in a chair without discomfort, but still find the addition of a pillow to the chair to increase their feeling of comfort.

Like certain other terms describing positive feelings or abstractions (hope, charity, chastity), comfort may also be used as a personal name.


See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. 1.0 1.1 Daniel Miller, The Comfort of Things (2009).
  2. 2.0 2.1 Katharine Kolcaba, Comfort Theory and Practice: A Vision for Holistic Health Care and Research (2003).
This page uses Creative Commons Licensed content from Wikipedia (view authors).

Around Wikia's network

Random Wiki