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Chlorphentermine

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Chlorphentermine chemical structure
Chlorphentermine

4-chloro-α,α-dimethylphenethylamine
IUPAC name
CAS number
461-78-9
ATC code

[[ATC_code_|]][1]

PubChem
[2]
DrugBank
[3]
Chemical formula {{{chemical_formula}}}
Molecular weight 183.68
Bioavailability
Metabolism
Elimination half-life
Excretion
Pregnancy category
Legal status
Routes of administration


Chlorphentermine (Apsedon, Desopimon, Lucofen) is a stimulant drug which was used as an appetite suppressant. It was invented in 1962, and is the 4-chloro derivative of the better known appetite suppressant phentermine,[1] which is still in current use.

Chlorphentermine itself is a relatively weak stimulant with little abuse potential, but is classed as a Schedule 3 drug in the USA due mainly to its similarity to other appetite suppressants such as diethylpropion which have been more widely abused. It is no longer used due mainly to safety concerns, as it has a serotonergic effects profile similar to other withdrawn appetite suppressants such as fenfluramine and aminorex which were found to cause pulmonary hypertension and cardiac fibrosis following prolonged use.[2]

References Edit

  1. Gylys JA, Hart JJ, Warren MR. Chlorphentermine, a new anorectic agent. Journal of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics. 1962 Sep;137:365-73.
  2. Rothman RB, Ayestas MA, Dersch CM, Baumann MH. Aminorex, fenfluramine, and chlorphentermine are serotonin transporter substrates. Implications for primary pulmonary hypertension. Circulation. 1999 Aug 24;100(8):869-75.


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