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==Biological role of chloride==
 
==Biological role of chloride==
   
Chloride ions have important [[physiology|physiological]] roles. For instance, in the [[central nervous system]], the inhibitory action of [[glycine]] and some of the action of [[GABA]] relies on the entry of Cl<small><sup>&minus;</sup></small> into specific neurons. Also, the [[chloride-bicarbonate exchanger]] biological transport [[protein]] relies on the chloride ion to increase the [[blood]]'s capacity of [[carbon dioxide]], in the form of the [[bicarbonate]] ion.
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Chloride is a chemical the human body needs for metabolism (the process of turning food into energy).<ref>http://www.med.umich.edu/1libr/aha/aha_schlorid_crs.htm</ref> It also helps keep the body's acid-base balance. The amount of chloride in the blood is carefully controlled by the kidneys. ''Further reading:[[Renal chloride reabsorption]]''
   
Chloride is found in many household liquids like [[water]] and other beverages (Coke, Sprite and other sodas).
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Chloride ions have important [[physiology|physiological]] roles. For instance, in the [[central nervous system]], the inhibitory action of [[glycine]] and some of the action of [[GABA]] relies on the entry of Cl<small><sup>&minus;</sup></small> into specific neurons. Also, the [[chloride-bicarbonate exchanger]] biological transport [[protein]] relies on the chloride ion to increase the [[blood]]'s capacity of [[carbon dioxide]], in the form of the [[bicarbonate]] ion.
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==Blood levels==
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The normal [[blood values|blood reference range]] of chloride for adults in most labs is 95 to 105 milliequivalents (mEq) per liter. The normal range may vary slightly from lab to lab. Normal ranges are usually shown next to your results in the lab report.
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[[Image:Reference ranges for blood tests - by molarity2.svg|thumb|600px|center|[[Reference ranges for blood tests]], showing blood content of chloride at far right in the spectrum.]]
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The North American [[Dietary Reference Intake]] recommends a daily intake of between 2300 and 3600&nbsp;mg/day for 25-year-old males.
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==See also==
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*[[Neurobiology of anxiety]]
   
 
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Latest revision as of 15:44, March 1, 2010

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The chloride ion is formed when the element chlorine picks up one electron to form an anion (negatively-charged ion) Cl. The salts of hydrochloric acid HCl contain chloride ions and can also be called chlorides. An example is table salt, which is sodium chloride with the chemical formula NaCl. In water, it dissolves into Na+ and Cl ions.

The word chloride can also refer to a chemical compound in which one or more chlorine atoms are covalently bonded in the molecule. This means that chlorides can be either inorganic or organic compounds. The simplest example of an inorganic covalently-bonded chloride is hydrogen chloride, HCl. A simple example of an organic covalently-bonded (an organochloride) chloride is chloromethane (CH3Cl), often called methyl chloride.

Biological role of chlorideEdit

Chloride is a chemical the human body needs for metabolism (the process of turning food into energy).[1] It also helps keep the body's acid-base balance. The amount of chloride in the blood is carefully controlled by the kidneys. Further reading:Renal chloride reabsorption

Chloride ions have important physiological roles. For instance, in the central nervous system, the inhibitory action of glycine and some of the action of GABA relies on the entry of Cl into specific neurons. Also, the chloride-bicarbonate exchanger biological transport protein relies on the chloride ion to increase the blood's capacity of carbon dioxide, in the form of the bicarbonate ion.


Blood levelsEdit

The normal blood reference range of chloride for adults in most labs is 95 to 105 milliequivalents (mEq) per liter. The normal range may vary slightly from lab to lab. Normal ranges are usually shown next to your results in the lab report.

File:Reference ranges for blood tests - by molarity2.svg
Reference ranges for blood tests, showing blood content of chloride at far right in the spectrum.

The North American Dietary Reference Intake recommends a daily intake of between 2300 and 3600 mg/day for 25-year-old males.

See alsoEdit

This page uses Creative Commons Licensed content from Wikipedia (view authors).

Cite error: <ref> tags exist, but no <references/> tag was found

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