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Changes: Children of military personnel

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(See also)
 
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==See also==
 
==See also==
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*[[Military brat]]
  +
*[[Military brat (U.S. subculture)]]
 
*[[Military psychology]]
 
*[[Military psychology]]
 
*[[Missionary kids]]
 
*[[Missionary kids]]

Latest revision as of 10:53, July 13, 2013

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The children of military personnel (aka military brats) have one or more parents who serves or served full-time in the military. Being a military brat particularly implies that one:

  • moved frequently as a child, because one's family was stationed at new locations every year or two
  • attended many different schools (including military schools) and never established strong roots in a community.
  • had exposure to military discipline and authority from early childhood, which often leads to comfort in dealing with institutional authority, but occasionally leads to rebellion against it.
  • can make friends quickly, and can deal with long-distance relationships
  • high cross-cultural understanding


Later in life, such children often find themselves very comfortable in foreign cultures. Many join the diplomatic corps or join the military themselves.

Third Culture Kid is a more general term for this phenomenon. It carries connotations of having a stricter upbringing than many people.


See alsoEdit

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