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Central pain syndrome

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Central pain syndrome
ICD-10
ICD-9 338.0
OMIM [1]
DiseasesDB [2]
MedlinePlus [3]
eMedicine /
MeSH {{{MeshNumber}}}

Central pain syndrome is a neurological condition caused by the malfunctioning of the Central Nervous System (CNS) which causes a sensitization of the pain system. The extent of pain and the areas affected are related to the cause of the injury, which can include trauma, tumors, stroke, Multiple Sclerosis, Parkinson's disease, or epilepsy . Pain can either be relegated to a specific part of the body or affect the body as a whole.

SymptomsEdit

Pain is typically constant, may be moderate to severe in intensity, and is often made worse by touch, movement, emotions, and temperature changes, usually cold temperatures. Burning pain is the most common sensation, but patients also report pins and needles, pressing, lacerating, aching, and extreme bursts of sharp pain. Individuals may have reduced sensitivity to touch in the areas affected by the pain. The burning and loss of touch are usually most severe on the distant parts of the body, such as the feet or hands. [1]

TreatmentEdit

Treatments are rarely able to eliminate the pain, but painkillers can reduce it. Tricyclic antidepressants and anticonvulsants can also help, as can reduction of stress.

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. Bowsher, David (1996), "Central pain: clinical and physiological characteristics", Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery, and Psychiatry 61: 62–69, doi:10.1136/jnnp.61.1.62, http://jnnp.bmj.com/cgi/content/abstract/61/1/62  FREE full text. Requires 2 minute registration with BMJ.

External linksEdit

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