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Brodmann area 40

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BA40

Brodmann area 40, or BA40, is part of the parietal cortex in the human brain. BA40 is in the area of the supramarginal gyrus, which lies at the posterior end of the lateral fissure, in the inferior lateral part of the parietal lobe.

This area is also known as supramarginal area 40 (H). It is bounded approximately by the intraparietal sulcus, the inferior postcentral sulcus, the posterior subcentral sulcus and the lateral sulcus. Cytoarchitecturally it is bounded caudally by the angular area 39 (H), rostrally and dorsally by the caudal postcentral area 2, and ventrally by the subcentral area 43 and the superior temporal area 22 (Brodmann-1909).

The parietal operculum (PO)Edit

AnatomyEdit

This region, forming the superior bank of the sylvian fissure, as studied in the cat, contains the secondary somatosensory representation, 'S-II', and a second somatotopic representation (parietal ventral, or PV). Anatomically, primate S-II receives inputs from area 3 and area 1, and projects to PV and area 7. PV has projections to area 5 and premotor areas.

FunctionEdit

Single cell recording in primates show neurons with larger receptive fields than primary somatosensory cortex, responding to bilateral tactile stimuli, and showing attentional modulation.

In humans, PO is activated during somatosensory stimulation, texture discrimination tasks, and in motor tasks involving sensory feedback. It is also involved in tactile learning and memory, and may also perform co-ordinate transformations from the somatotopic to other spatial frames.

ReferencesEdit

  • Neuroanatomical definition of supramarginal area 40 (H) provided by BrainInfo - a free neuroscientific portal on the web. See mor images of supramarginal area 40 (H) here.

See alsoEdit


Telencephalon (cerebrum, cerebral cortex, cerebral hemispheres) - edit

primary sulci/fissures: medial longitudinal, lateral, central, parietoöccipital, calcarine, cingulate

frontal lobe: precentral gyrus (primary motor cortex, 4), precentral sulcus, superior frontal gyrus (6, 8), middle frontal gyrus (46), inferior frontal gyrus (Broca's area, 44-pars opercularis, 45-pars triangularis), prefrontal cortex (orbitofrontal cortex, 9, 10, 11, 12, 47)

parietal lobe: postcentral sulcus, postcentral gyrus (1, 2, 3, 43), superior parietal lobule (5), inferior parietal lobule (39-angular gyrus, 40), precuneus (7), intraparietal sulcus

occipital lobe: primary visual cortex (17), cuneus, lingual gyrus, 18, 19 (18 and 19 span whole lobe)

temporal lobe: transverse temporal gyrus (41-42-primary auditory cortex), superior temporal gyrus (38, 22-Wernicke's area), middle temporal gyrus (21), inferior temporal gyrus (20), fusiform gyrus (36, 37)

limbic lobe/fornicate gyrus: cingulate cortex/cingulate gyrus, anterior cingulate (24, 32, 33), posterior cingulate (23, 31),
isthmus (26, 29, 30), parahippocampal gyrus (piriform cortex, 25, 27, 35), entorhinal cortex (28, 34)

subcortical/insular cortex: rhinencephalon, olfactory bulb, corpus callosum, lateral ventricles, septum pellucidum, ependyma, internal capsule, corona radiata, external capsule

hippocampal formation: dentate gyrus, hippocampus, subiculum

basal ganglia: striatum (caudate nucleus, putamen), lentiform nucleus (putamen, globus pallidus), claustrum, extreme capsule, amygdala, nucleus accumbens

Some categorizations are approximations, and some Brodmann areas span gyri.

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