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This page lists living orders and families of birds. The links below should then lead to family accounts of bird behavior etc and hence to individual species.

There are two main orders and about 180 bird families, some containing thousands of species.

Taxonomy is very fluid in the age of DNA analysis, so comments are made where appropriate, and all numbers are approximate. In particular see Sibley-Ahlquist taxonomy for a very different classification.

From a behavioral point of view the families show patterns of adaptation to environments and associated repertoires of behavior.

PaleognathaeEdit

The flightless and mostly giant Struthioniformes lack a keeled sternum and are collectively known as ratites. Together with the Tinamiformes, they form the Paleognathae or "old jaws", one of the two evolutionary superorders.

StruthioniformesEdit

Africa and Australasia; 2 species.

RheiformesEdit

South America; 2 species.

TinamiformesEdit

South America; 45 species.

CasuariiformesEdit

Australasia; 4 species.

ApterygiformesEdit

Australasia; 5 species.

NeognathaeEdit

Nearly all living birds belong to the superorder of Neognathae or "new jaws". With their keels, unlike the ratites, they are known as carinatae. The passerines alone account for well over 5000 species.

AnseriformesEdit

Worldwide; 150 species.

GalliformesEdit

Worldwide; 250 species.

PodicipediformesEdit

Worldwide; 19 species; sometimes grouped with Phoenicopteriformes.

PhoenicopteriformesEdit

Worldwide; 6 species.

MesitornithiformesEdit

Madagascar, Neotropics, New Caledonia; 5 species.

PteroclidiformesEdit

Africa, Europe, Asia; 16 species; sometimes grouped with Columbiformes.

ColumbiformesEdit

Worldwide; 300 species.

PhaethontiformesEdit

Oceanic; 3 species.

CaprimulgiformesEdit

Worldwide; 90 species.

ApodiformesEdit

Worldwide; 400 species.

AegotheliformesEdit

Oceania; 10 species; sometimes grouped with Apodiformes.

CuculiformesEdit

Worldwide; 126 species.

OpisthocomiformesEdit

South America; 1 species.

MusophagiformesEdit

Africa; 23 species.

GruiformesEdit

Worldwide; 191 species.

GaviiformesEdit

North America, Eurasia; 5 species.

SphenisciformesEdit

Antarctic and southern waters; 17 species.

ProcellariiformesEdit

Pan-oceanic; 120 species.

CiconiiformesEdit

Worldwide; 19 species.

PelecaniformesEdit

Worldwide; 108 species.

SuliformesEdit

Worldwide; 59 species.

CharadriiformesEdit

Worldwide; 350 species

AccipitriformesEdit

Worldwide; 200 species.

StrigiformesEdit

Worldwide; 130 species.

ColiiformesEdit

Sub-Saharan Africa; 6 species.

TrogoniformesEdit

Sub-Saharan Africa, Americas, Asia; 35 species.

CoraciiformesEdit

Worldwide; 144 species.

BucerotiformesEdit

Old World, New Guinea; 64 species.

LeptosomatiformesEdit

Madagascar; 1 species.

PiciformesEdit

Worldwide except Australasia; 400 species.

FalconiformesEdit

Worldwide; 60 species.

CariamiformesEdit

South America; 2 species.

PsittaciformesEdit

Pan-tropical, southern temperate zones; 330 species.

PasseriformesEdit

Worldwide; 5000 species.

See alsoEdit

For regions smaller than continents see:

ReferencesEdit



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