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Bartholin's glands

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Bartholin's gland
Genital organs of female.
1 - vaginal opening
2 - Bartholin's glands
3 - bulbus vestibuli
4 - vagina
5 - uterus (womb)
6 - ovaries
7 - Fallopian tubes
8 - bladder
9 - clitoris
Latin glandula vestibularis major
Gray's subject #270 1266
System
MeSH A05.360.319.887.220
[[Image:|190px|center|]]

The Bartholin's glands (also called Bartholin glands or greater vestibular glands) are two glands located slightly below and to the left and right of the opening of the vagina in women. They secrete mucus to provide lubrication.[1][2]

Bartholin's glands are homologous to Cowper's glands in males. However, while Bartholin's glands are located in the superficial perineal pouch, Cowper's glands are located in the deep perineal pouch.

File:Skenes gland.jpg



Function and purposeEdit

They secrete mucus to provide vaginal lubrication.[3][4] Bartholin's glands secrete relatively minute amounts (one or two drops) of fluid just before a woman orgasms.[5] The minute droplets of fluid were once believed as important for lubricating the vagina, but research from Masters and Johnson demonstrated that vaginal lubrication comes from deeper within the vagina.[5] The fluid may slightly moisten the labial opening of the vagina, serving to make contact with this sensitive area more comfortable for the woman.[5]

InfectionEdit

Although unusual, it is possible for the Bartholin's glands to become irritated or infected, resulting in swelling and pain.[5] This condition can be easily treated by a qualified medical professional.[5]


Eponym Edit

They were first described in the 17th century, by the Danish anatomist Caspar Bartholin the Younger (1655-1738). Some sources mistakenly ascribe their discovery to his grandfather, theologian and anatomist Caspar Bartholin the Elder (1585 - 1629).[6][7]

See also Edit

References Edit

  1. Viscera of the Urogenital Triangle, University of Arkansas Medical School
  2. Chrétien, F.C., Berthou J. (Sept. 18, 2006). Crystallographic investigation of the dried exudate of the major vestibular (Bartholin's) glands in women.. Eur J Obstet Gynecol Reprod Biol..
  3. Viscera of the Urogenital Triangle, University of Arkansas Medical School
  4. Chrétien, F.C., Berthou J. (September 18, 2006). Crystallographic investigation of the dried exudate of the major vestibular (Bartholin's) glands in women.. Eur J Obstet Gynecol Reprod Biol..
  5. 5.0 5.1 5.2 5.3 5.4 Bartholin's Gland from Discovery health
  6. C. C. Gillispie (ed.): Dictionary of Scientific Biography, New York 1970. See the article on Thomas Bartholin.
  7. Who Named It synd/3320

External linksEdit

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