Wikia

Psychology Wiki

Assonance

Talk0
34,141pages on
this wiki
Revision as of 07:07, January 5, 2012 by Dr Joe Kiff (Talk | contribs)

(diff) ← Older revision | Latest revision (diff) | Newer revision → (diff)

Assessment | Biopsychology | Comparative | Cognitive | Developmental | Language | Individual differences | Personality | Philosophy | Social |
Methods | Statistics | Clinical | Educational | Industrial | Professional items | World psychology |

Language: Linguistics · Semiotics · Speech


Manners of articulation
Obstruent
Plosive (occlusive)
Affricate
Fricative
Sibilant
Sonorant
Nasal
Flap/Tap
Approximant
Liquid
Vowel
Semivowel
Lateral
Trill
Airstreams
Pulmonic
Ejective
Implosive
Click
Alliteration
Assonance
Consonance
See also: Place of articulation
This page contains phonetic information in IPA, which may not display correctly in some browsers. [Help]
edit

Assonance is the repetition of vowel sounds to create internal rhyming within phrases or sentences, and together with alliteration and consonance[1] serves as one of the building blocks of verse. For example, in the phrase "Do you like blue?", the /uː/ ("o"/"ou"/"ue" sound) is repeated within the sentence and is assonant.

Assonance is found more often in verse than in prose. It is used in (mainly modern) English-language poetry, and is particularly important in Old French, Spanish and the Celtic languages.

The eponymous student of Willy Russell's Educating Rita described it as "getting the rhyme wrong".

ExamplesEdit

  •  
the silken sad uncertain rustling of each purple curtain Edgar Allan Poe, "The Raven"
  •  
And murmuring of innumerable bees Alfred Lord Tennyson, The Princess VII.203
  •  
The crumbling thunder of seas Robert Louis Stevenson
  •  
That solitude which suits abstruser musings Samuel Taylor Coleridge, "Frost at Midnight"
  •  
The scurrying furred small friars squeal in the dowse Dylan Thomas
  •  
Dead in the middle of little Italy, little did we know that we riddled two middle men who didn't do diddily." Big Pun, "Twinz"
  •  
It's hot and it's monotonous. Stephen Sondheim, Sunday in the Park with George, It's Hot Up Here
  •  
tundi tur unda Catullus 11
  •  
on a proud round cloud in white high night E.E. Cummings, if a cheerfulest Elephantangelchild should sit
  •  
I've never seen so many Dominican women with cinnamon tans Will Smith, "Miami"
  •  
I bomb atomically—Socrates' philosophies and hypotheses can't define how I be droppin' these mockeries. Inspectah Deck, from the Wu-Tang Clan's "Triumph."
  •  
Up in the arroyo a rare owl's nest I did spy, so I loaded up my shotgun and watched owl feathers fly Jon Wayne, Texas Assonance
  •  
Some kids who played games about Narnia got gradually balmier and balmier C.S. Lewis The Voyage of the Dawn Treader
  •  
And the moon rose over an open field Paul Simon, America

J. R. R. Tolkien's Errantry is a poem whose meter contains three sets of trisyllabic assonances in every set of four lines.

Assonance can also be used in forming proverbs, often a form of short poetry. In the Oromo language of Ethiopia, note the use of a single vowel throughout the following proverb, an extreme form of assonance:

  • kan mana baala, aʔlaa gaala (“A leaf at home, but a camel elsewhere"; somebody who has a big reputation among those who do not know him well.)

In more modern verse, stressed assonance is frequently used as a rhythmic device in modern rap. An example is Public Enemy's 'Don't Believe The Hype': "Their pens and pads I snatch 'cause I've had it / I'm not an addict, fiending for static / I see their tape recorder and I grab it / No, you can't have it back, silly rabbit".

See also Edit

SourcesEdit

References Edit

  1. Khurana, Ajeet "Assonance and Consonance" Outstanding Writing. [1]
This page uses Creative Commons Licensed content from Wikipedia (view authors).

Around Wikia's network

Random Wiki