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Association fibers

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Brain: Association fiber
Gray751
Diagram showing principal systems of association fibers in the cerebrum.
Dissection of cerebral cortex and brainstem showing association fibers and insular cortex after removal of its superficial grey matter
Latin Fibrae associationis telencephali
Gray's subject #189 843
Part of
Components
Artery
Vein
BrainInfo/UW -
MeSH [1]

Association fibers are bundles of axons within the brain that unite different parts of the same cerebral hemisphere.

In human neuroanatomy, bundles of axons within the brain, called fibers, can be categorized by their function into association fibers, projection fibers, and commissural fibers.

The association fibers unite different parts of the same cerebral hemisphere, and are of two kinds: (1) those connecting adjacent gyri, short association fibers; (2) those passing between more distant parts, long association fibers.

Short association fibersEdit

The short association fibers (also often referred to as "U-fibers") lie immediately beneath the gray substance of the cortex of the hemispheres, and connect together adjacent gyri.

Long association fibersEdit

The long association fibers include the following:

Name From To
uncinate fasciculus frontal lobe temporal lobe
cingulum cingulate gyrus entorhinal cortex
superior longitudinal fasciculus frontal lobe occipital lobe
inferior longitudinal fasciculus occipital lobe temporal lobe
perpendicular fasciculus inferior parietal lobule fusiform gyrus
occipitofrontal fasciculus occipital lobe frontal lobe
fornix hippocampus mammillary bodies
Arcuate fasciculus frontal lobe temporal lobe

Diffusion tensor imaging is a non-invasive method to study the course of association fibers.

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

This article was originally based on an entry from a public domain edition of Gray's Anatomy. As such, some of the information contained herein may be outdated. Please edit the article if this is the case, and feel free to remove this notice when it is no longer relevant.

External linksEdit


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