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Association cortex

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The association cortex is that part of the cerebral cortex which includes the association areas that function to produce a meaningful perceptual experience of the world, enable us to interact effectively, and support abstract thinking and language. The parietal, temporal, and occipital lobes - all located in the posterior part of the cortex - organize sensory information into a coherent perceptual model of our environment centered on our body image. The frontal lobe or prefrontal association complex is involved in planning actions and movement, as well as abstract thought. In the past it was theorized that language abilities are localized in the left hemisphere in areas 44/45, the Broca's area, for language expression and area 22, the Wernicke's area, for language reception. However, language is no longer limited to easily identifiable areas. More recent research suggests that the processes of language expression and reception occur in areas other than just those structures around the lateral sulcus, including the prefrontal lobe, basal ganglia, cerebellum, pons, and the caudate nucleus. The association areas integrate information from different receptors or sensory areas and relate the information to past experiences. Then the brain makes a decision and sends nerve impulses to the motor areas to give responses. [1]

Lateral surface of cerebral cortex - gyri

Lateral surface of the human cerebral cortex

File:Medial surface of cerebral cortex - entorhinal cortex.png

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. Cathy J. Price (2000). The anatomy of language: contributions from functional neuroimaging. Journal of Anatomy 197 (3): 335–359.

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