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Anisometropia

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Anisometropia
ICD-10 H523
ICD-9 367.31
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Anisometropia is the condition in which the two eyes have unequal refractive power; that is, are in different states of myopia (nearsightedness), hyperopia (farsightedness) or in the extreme, antimetropia (wherein one eye is myopic and the other is hyperopic), the unequal refractive states cause unequal rotations thus leading to diplopia and asthenopia.

Anisometropia can adversely affect the development of binocular vision in infants and children if there is a large difference in clarity between the two eyes. The brain will often suppress the vision of the blurrier eye in a condition called amblyopia, or lazy eye.

Spectacle correction Edit

For those with large degrees of anisometropia, spectacle correction may cause the person to experience a difference in image magnification between the two eyes which could also prevent the development of good binocular vision.

One study estimated that 6% of those between the ages of 6 and 18 have anisometropia[1]

The name is from four Greek components: an- "not," iso- "same," metr- "measure," ops "eye."

ReferencesEdit

  1. Czepita D, Goslawski W, Mojsa A. "[Occurrence of anisometropia among students ranging from 6 to 18 years of age.]" Klin Oczna. 2005;107(4-6):297-9. Polish. PMID 16118943.


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