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Androstadienone

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Androstadienone chemical structure
Androstadienone

(8S,9S,10R,13R,14S)-10,13-dimethyl-1,2,6,7,8,9,11,12,14,15-decahydrocyclopenta[a]phenanthren-3-one
IUPAC name
CAS number
4075-07-4
ATC code

none{{{ATC_suffix}}}

PubChem
92979
DrugBank
{{{DrugBank}}}
Chemical formula {{{chemical_formula}}}
Molecular weight 270.408 g/mol
Bioavailability
Metabolism
Elimination half-life {{{elimination_half-life}}}
Excretion
Pregnancy category
Legal status
Routes of administration


Androstadienone, also known as androsta-4,16,-dien-3-one, is a chemical compound found in human sweat.

It has been described as having strong pheromone-like activities in humans.[1]

It is a metabolite of the sex hormone testosterone: however, androstadienone does not exhibit any known androgenic or anabolic effects. Though it has been reported to significantly affect the mood of heterosexual women and homosexual men, it does not alter behavior overtly,[2] although it may have more subtle effects on attention.[3] Androstadienone is commonly sold in male fragrances, it is purported, to increase sexual attraction.

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. Wyart C, Webster WW, Chen JH, Wilson SR, McClary A, Khan RM, Sobel N (February 2007). Smelling a single component of male sweat alters levels of cortisol in women. J Neurosci 27 (6): 1261–5.
  2. Lundström JN, Olsson MJ (December 2005). Subthreshold amounts of social odorant affect mood, but not behavior, in heterosexual women when tested by a male, but not a female, experimenter. Biol Psychol 70 (3): 197–204.
  3. Hummer TA, McClintock MK (April 2009). Putative human pheromone androstadienone attunes the mind specifically to emotional information. Horm Behav 55 (4): 548–59.

External linksEdit



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