Wikia

Psychology Wiki

Changes: Amor fati

Edit

Back to page

(File added via photo placeholder)
 
Line 8: Line 8:
 
Quote from "Why I Am So Clever" in ''[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ecce_Homo_%28book%29 Ecce Homo]'', section 10<sup class="reference" id="cite_ref-0">[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amor_fati#cite_note-0 [1]]</sup>:
 
Quote from "Why I Am So Clever" in ''[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ecce_Homo_%28book%29 Ecce Homo]'', section 10<sup class="reference" id="cite_ref-0">[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amor_fati#cite_note-0 [1]]</sup>:
 
My formula for greatness in a human being is ''amor fati'': that one wants nothing to be different, not forward, not backward, not in all eternity. Not merely bear what is necessary, still less conceal it—all idealism is mendaciousness in the face of what is necessary—but ''love'' it.
 
My formula for greatness in a human being is ''amor fati'': that one wants nothing to be different, not forward, not backward, not in all eternity. Not merely bear what is necessary, still less conceal it—all idealism is mendaciousness in the face of what is necessary—but ''love'' it.
  +
  +
===See also===

Latest revision as of 13:33, March 5, 2011

Friedrich Nietzsche Ecco Homo-8x6


Amor fati is a Latin phrase coined by Nietzsche loosely translating to "love of fate" or "love of one's fate". It is used to describe an attitude in which one sees everything that happens in one's life, including suffering and loss, as good. Moreover, it is characterized by an acceptance of the events or situations that occur in one's life.

The phrase is used repeatedly in Nietzsche's writings and is representative of the general outlook on life he articulates in section 276 of The Gay Science, which reads, I want to learn more and more to see as beautiful what is necessary in things; then I shall be one of those who make things beautiful. Amor fati: let that be my love henceforth! I do not want to wage war against what is ugly. I do not want to accuse; I do not even want to accuse those who accuse. Looking away shall be my only negation. And all in all and on the whole: some day I wish to be only a Yes-sayer. Quote from "Why I Am So Clever" in Ecce Homo, section 10[1]: My formula for greatness in a human being is amor fati: that one wants nothing to be different, not forward, not backward, not in all eternity. Not merely bear what is necessary, still less conceal it—all idealism is mendaciousness in the face of what is necessary—but love it.

See alsoEdit

Around Wikia's network

Random Wiki